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8/07/2020 9:36 am  #1


Identifying animal scat

Just returned from a short trip with my little one and came across animal scat about 60 feet from the fire pit.  A quick google showed it was likely moose but now I'm not so sure. (Although I convinced myself that's what it was because I didn't want to even consider it might be bear).  Round in shape and a lot of it!  Almost like horse manure.  I asked a park attendant on our way home and she thought it was likely moose as well.  

1)  Does this sound like moose scat?
2)  Is 60 feet too close for comfort?
3)  If it was a moose, what problems could that pose?

 

8/07/2020 9:47 am  #2


Re: Identifying animal scat

1. Yes, that's moose scat. 
2. It's moose scat, so nothing to worry about. You'll see it all over the place around many campsites (and along portages, and anywhere else you happen to look). 
3. Nothing to be concerned about. A moose is extremely unlikely to come calling when a campsite is occupied. 
 

 

8/07/2020 9:51 am  #3


Re: Identifying animal scat

Yes it sounds like moose. Moose don't hang around in one place really other than while they are eating. That can include wandering through a camp although they are more likely to wander past a campsite, including occasionally walking through front country campgrounds. 

At this time of year, there really isn't much to worry about. If you see a moose while on the water or crossing a portage, then give it space. On a narrow river/creek that can mean waiting until the moose chooses to move on. On a lake it just means paddling around it. 

If a moose is wandering towards your campsite, make some noise so it knows you are there. 

In the fall during the rut (mating season) then bull moose can be aggressive. At that time you year you want to be more proactive about getting out of the way as opposed to just staying out of the way. 

Overall moose are pretty passive and really tolerant of humans as you can see from the many moose calmly browsing along the sides of Hwy 60 while hordes of people stop and take pictures. 

 

Last edited by RobW (8/07/2020 9:52 am)

 

8/07/2020 10:06 am  #4


Re: Identifying animal scat

Thanks everyone. I feel a lot better now.  It was a little nerve wracking to see, especially so close to camp.  Could that also have been the loud splash I heard in the early morning?  This was a reaaally loud splash - John Candy doing a cannonball loud.

     Thread Starter
 

8/07/2020 12:41 pm  #5


Re: Identifying animal scat

The very loud single splash was likely a beaver slapping its tail as a warning to other beavers and as a mechanism to distract possible prey.  If you startle a beaver or get it cornered in water, it will often slap its tail as part of the getaway process.

How fresh were the moose droppings?  Warm?  Salty flavor?

 

8/07/2020 1:49 pm  #6


Re: Identifying animal scat

papabear wrote:

1)  Does this sound like moose scat?
2)  Is 60 feet too close for comfort?
3)  If it was a moose, what problems could that pose?

Yes, that sounds like moose scat. Deer is similar but smaller and maybe rounder. I think it's hard to walk for more than 100 m in Algonquin without seeing a large turd pile.

We once arrived at a site just as the last light disappeared and in the dark you could hear my dog cheerfully eating something that looked like fresh berry infused bear poop right in camp. It's nothing to worry about. There are around 2000 bears in Algonquin so one is never very far away. Just don't give them any food (intentional or not) and things will be fine. I've seen zero bears in Algonquin but dozens of bear turds.
 

 

8/07/2020 7:31 pm  #7


Re: Identifying animal scat

Maybe things are different in that part of Ontario, but round, bally moose scat indicates winter production. Summer poop is more, well... gooey.

 

8/08/2020 8:56 am  #8


Re: Identifying animal scat

There were no flies or other insects on it, so perhaps it had been there for awhile. 

@PaPaddler can't comment on the saltiness of it.  https://cdn.boardhost.com/emoticons/cute.png

     Thread Starter
 

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