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5/22/2021 5:46 pm  #1


bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

is it possible to use a bent shaft paddle with a dedicated  solo canoe?  do you j -stroke or switch sides often. thumbs up, thumbs down positioning?
          any insights/ experiences concerning bent shaft paddles is appreciated ,, thanks
     
       

Last edited by swedish pimple (5/22/2021 5:47 pm)

 

5/22/2021 7:11 pm  #2


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

It’s pretty easy to use solo actually and the J stroke does work with a bent shaft but the real savings on your shoulder and gain in efficiency is from switching sides regularly. Depending on the setup in your boat switching sides results in water dripping on your gear with every side change and with bent shaft it’s a lot of side changes. I really
Like the bent shaft for solo but I always bring a regular paddle too. Bent shaft on open water, regular paddle in rivers and creeks.

Even more popular, based on my YouTube watching, is the kayak paddle. I don’t think I would ever go that route but it certainly adds a lot
To efficiency and speed.

 

5/22/2021 7:40 pm  #3


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

On flat water trips I exclusively paddle my solo with a bent shaft and a kayak paddle. I have for a long time. It's pretty much the same as a straight shaft. I Shift my weight a little to the on side. This will change your hull shape so it naturally wants to turn to the on side. I do a couple of C's to get started, then a few J's followed by the Canadian. At that point it is all Canadian strokes. The knifing inwater retrieval does the correction as opposed to a J. I do this all day long and never switch sides.



 
Edit: When heeling the canoe to one side the direction it naturally wants to go varies based on whether you are bow or stern weighted. It is also greatly affected by wind, current, rocker and how the turn is initiated.

Last edited by MartinG (5/24/2021 8:17 am)

 

5/23/2021 3:48 pm  #4


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

thanks for the insights !!
      now i need a place to go,  l.o.l.

     Thread Starter
 

5/23/2021 5:49 pm  #5


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

Solo I sit-and-switch most of the time, using bent shaft shorty. This is the most relaxing stroke for long distance travel as far as I know, both on lakes and twisting creeks. If I want or need to us a J-stroke (adverse condition like strong cross-winds or whitewater) I use a longer straight shaft paddle - its J is much more efficient. I still have to learn Canadian with bent-shaft - saw some Martin's video and was impressed.


"Experience breeds competence only if you do things right." - Cliff Jacobson
 

5/24/2021 11:47 am  #6


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

I'm a cranker of a bent shaft in the last few years . I'd give er a thumbs up in a review , and generally paddle with it thumb down , although I do use the Goon stroke from time to time when best suited .
I've found it handy to have particularly headin up the Nippissing from Cedar . There's a short stretch on the lower Nip ( between the 945m and 230m ) where the river gets narrow and shallow with the current strong enough to push this old fart back down the river .
Over the years have found the longer otter tail digs into the rocks , with loss of momentum .. The shorter bent shaft works like a charm . I reckon one could use a straight racing paddle with the same results .
I also use it crossing Cedar , when every third wave is a swell and ya get a cool splash in yer face with a whitecap over the bow . In conditions like that , with the bent shaft ya can really dig in without the corrective j-stroke and are a might quicker gettin back to the Brent Store fer a soda pop and a good chat with Jake .

https://i.ibb.co/M1hysrD/DSC06184-Medium.jpg

 

5/24/2021 12:37 pm  #7


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

Fine looking paddles there John.

 

5/24/2021 8:00 pm  #8


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

       i have had numerous cortisone shots in each elbow over the years and was looking for some help with the paddling techniques,, now it seems that my left wrist  (paddling power side)  is acting up in terms of carpal tunnel,,  certain fingers are tingling and seem to be asleep,,, that's  life in the fast lane!!!
    is there a doctor in da house???

     Thread Starter
 

5/24/2021 8:08 pm  #9


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

Swede? You paddling  carbon or wood?? My carbon bent shafts are 11OZ I believe.  I used to have wrist issues  as well but the lighter paddles have a helped a ton. I do  notice the wind  catches  them on breezy days though. No issue tandem or solo.

 

5/24/2021 9:09 pm  #10


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

hey shayne ,thanks for asking
   my bike is carbon but my paddles are wooden eh,,  i have a short  red tail bent shaft, made in hastings ontario. i never thought of a carbon paddle.  although martin`s video is great because it shows using the gunwale to shoot/slide the paddle forward, really no lifting involved.  
   i just need some time and space to try things out!!
  thanks to everyone  for taking the time to explain things for me.  
     cheers

     Thread Starter
 

5/25/2021 8:07 am  #11


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

Maybe try a double bend bent shaft paddle Swedish? I have been using one for about five years and really like it. Started using a bent shaft 35 years ago but still like the otter tail when the water is deep and the wind at a minimum.

Prefer to paddle on the left  and dislike switching sides. Using the wind I can usually tack the boat so as to keep the blade on that side. Also, much of our canoeing is in shallow water. Lots of things to see and the bent blade with its relatively short length is well suited to this.

Kayak style paddling is not for me. Crashed my bicycle 45 years ago and kind of wrecked my right shoulder. That shoulder will be sore for several days after kayaking and even with pain killers it still hurts. Single blade left or right has been no problem though.

 

5/25/2021 8:18 am  #12


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

Martin, the sleeve on your paddle protecting it from aluminum gunwales - I wonder, what is it made of? I rather heavily rely on the gunwale for my J strokes, which wears off the wood (on the gunwale, not the carbon paddle) and Instead of changing my J technique I'd rather put some protection on the paddle.


"Experience breeds competence only if you do things right." - Cliff Jacobson
 

5/25/2021 8:32 am  #13


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

I pry or role off the gunnel pretty much all the time in my solo. Not so much in my tandem. think that is 25 feet of 2mm cotton cord whipped around the shaft. It's been on for years. I use this technique https://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~burchil/pm_canoe/whipping.html 

 

5/25/2021 9:01 am  #14


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

Terrific, thanks! My tandem gunwales are almost untouched as well - it's the matter of the gunwale line in the stern going away from the forward stroke straight paddle trajectory. But paddling from the center in a solo canoe, where gunwale is basically parallel to the stroke makes prying Js from the gunwale too tempting. Some purists would say it's a poor technique, but other purists agree it's the proper technique. It definitely saves lots of energy (and is easier on one's wrists) on a long day of paddling.


"Experience breeds competence only if you do things right." - Cliff Jacobson
 

5/26/2021 7:52 am  #15


Re: bent shaft paddles,,, any crankers out there??

EddyTurn wrote:

Terrific, thanks! My tandem gunwales are almost untouched as well - it's the matter of the gunwale line in the stern going away from the forward stroke straight paddle trajectory. But paddling from the center in a solo canoe, where gunwale is basically parallel to the stroke makes prying Js from the gunwale too tempting. Some purists would say it's a poor technique, but other purists agree it's the proper technique. It definitely saves lots of energy (and is easier on one's wrists) on a long day of paddling.

I feel better now. I too tend to pry

Last edited by Algonquintripper (5/26/2021 7:53 am)


Dave
 

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