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7/28/2020 6:18 pm  #1


scary rescue at high falls july 27th

 

7/29/2020 6:54 am  #2


Re: scary rescue at high falls july 27th

Link didn’t work for me, here it is again:

https://www.insideottawavalley.com/news-story/10124771--pretty-dramatic-woman-airlifted-from-algonquin-park-s-high-falls-in-joint-rescue-effort/

I went to high falls for the first time a few weeks ago. Amazing place, and lots of fun. I was definitely taken by the fact that you wouldn’t want to go over high falls themselves- I can’t believe she survived actually. Very scary indeed.

Edit: maybe it wasn’t high falls proper, that seems like more than 20 feet. Anyway, lots of waterfalls there that you don’t want to go over- hope she’s alright in the end.

Last edited by nvm (7/29/2020 7:02 am)

 

7/29/2020 9:39 am  #3


Re: scary rescue at high falls july 27th

Thanks for alerting, Swede.  Accidents can happen - it always pays to be extra, extra careful when in the backcountry.  She is fortunate that there were others around able to render immediate aid and to contact authorities as well.  The recognition of the collaborative effort of the rescuers sounds like they were a well-oiled machine.  I can't imagine the total cost of the time and equipment for that...

I agree, nvm, that is doesn't seem like she was swept over the falls based upon the story but the only thing that was completely clear was that it wasn't the waterslide.  I expect she was probably nosing around the overlook to the waterfall and slipped down that slope into the water below but no way of knowing without some detailed witness description.

 

7/29/2020 9:59 am  #4


 

7/29/2020 10:32 am  #5


Re: scary rescue at high falls july 27th

PaPaddler wrote:

.... The recognition of the collaborative effort of the rescuers sounds like they were a well-oiled machine.  I can't imagine the total cost of the time and equipment for that...
.....

This is an interesting article (relatively recent, from 2018) that makes it sound like the opposite of a well oiled machine: https://www.northbaynipissing.com/community-story/8396872-province-won-t-pay-for-rescue-efforts-in-algonquin-park/

Last edited by trippythings (7/29/2020 10:32 am)


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7/29/2020 12:53 pm  #6


Re: scary rescue at high falls july 27th

As far as the "well-oiled machine" comment I was referring to their actions in rescue operation collaboration.  The comment on costs was a separate topic...I would support the individual and their insurance be billed for at least a portion of that.  I'm not sure how that usually runs, but I expect that insurance companies get bills for at least some services in more common situations.  

These are the hazards of 'extreme' activities (extreme in quotes because remote Algonquin is probably considered extreme by 90% of the population but it's not BASE jumping extreme).

 

7/29/2020 2:04 pm  #7


Re: scary rescue at high falls july 27th

PaPaddler wrote:

As far as the "well-oiled machine" comment I was referring to their actions in rescue operation collaboration.  The comment on costs was a separate topic...I would support the individual and their insurance be billed for at least a portion of that.  I'm not sure how that usually runs, but I expect that insurance companies get bills for at least some services in more common situations.  

These are the hazards of 'extreme' activities (extreme in quotes because remote Algonquin is probably considered extreme by 90% of the population but it's not BASE jumping extreme).

I was actually linking the article in reference to the rescue collaboration, not the costs. The title of the article talks about the costs but a good chunk of the article itself talks about the relative disorganization of rescue efforts (the resulting effect of no one taking responsibility for costs).

"We were on the way when they asked us to stand down because there was another agency closer so we did and when we got back to the hall we got another call saying they had no way of getting the patient out and could we go and help them. They added at least a needless hour to the rescue plan,” said Maki. “That is frustrating when you are dealing with life-threatening issues.”

“With one-way communications tracking, people are sending messages through satellite to the 911 communications centre and reaching out from places that they couldn’t before. The alarming thing for us is that when you see people buying these devices, it shows they think that when they’re in the park, there is a plan in place and all they have to do is push a button and they will be rescued.”

But Maki claims EMS can’t reach a lot of these calls.

“That’s why they call us. We’re not going to say no, we have the equipment, we have the training, of course we’re going to go. The rescue end of it is where we shine, but there’s been very little planning when it comes to emergency response and rescue within the park.”

...But Maki would be a lot happier if there was a clear-cut emergency response protocol in place.

 

Last edited by trippythings (7/29/2020 2:04 pm)


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