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11/13/2019 10:56 am  #1


Fire Gloves

What do you use to protect your hands when cooking over an open campfire?  (rag, cotton gloves, split leather gloves, silicon/Kevlar BBQ gloves, welding gloves, etc). 

I have been using cheapo split leather work gloves but if I'm not careful I burn my finger when picking up a hot pot handle.  I am considering getting a pair of "BlueFire" gloves as an upgrade.

Cheers

 

11/13/2019 7:07 pm  #2


Re: Fire Gloves

I've always used the cheapest glove I can find at Canadian Tire ...... that goes for plenty things used around a fire .
Thirty some years ago , I bought the latest gortex jacket fer a weeks pay . Came back from a winter camp with three holes and a scorch up the sleeve .
A lesson learned ..... and since followed .
https://i.ibb.co/F6zQJTz/DSC00301-Large.jpg
 
 

 

11/13/2019 10:38 pm  #3


Re: Fire Gloves

I'm with you here John.  I use cheapo gloves for around the fire (and change out of my Arc'Teryx and into something I don't care if it gets full of burn holes!)

 

11/14/2019 9:08 am  #4


Re: Fire Gloves

I just use winter weight work gloves, for some reason they still tend to use cotton for backing and insulation, which is far more fire retardant than synthetics, and are thick enough that a hot handle won't burn

 

11/14/2019 6:07 pm  #5


Re: Fire Gloves

I don't usually cook over a fire unless its hot dogs and then I'm usually bare handed. For lifting my pot I use my paddle gloves (or Dickes work gloves if hiking, rubbery palm and fingers with synthetic back) and perhaps also use my small kitchen towel. 

 

11/15/2019 8:34 am  #6


Re: Fire Gloves

I use cheap leather work gloves...but I soak them in the lake first.  Figured this out after a rainy day paddle - we built a big fire at the site to warm up and dry off and I realized the wet gloves allowed me to grab anything.  A hot pot is no problem, a burning log or the hot grate can even be handled quickly.  

 

12/23/2019 4:31 pm  #7


Re: Fire Gloves

A few nights ago when it was -15 C  I was playing with a campfire and wearing my new MEC Cascade gloves. When the burning logs would roll out of the fire I'd pick them up and put them back on, no problems. The next day I expected these nylon gloves would have showed signs of wear but they came through looking pretty good. These are my new favorite winter gloves. 

 

12/25/2019 2:59 pm  #8


Re: Fire Gloves

I can always find something at Value Village for about $7. Usually some high tech, well insulated ski gloves or  leather mittens do the trick and never pre-occupied with whether they will get wrecked or burned. Value Village has become one of my favourite stores for outdoor camp wear. 

 

1/01/2020 3:10 am  #9


Re: Fire Gloves

For the fire I’ve found that a pair of welding gloves are awesome. You can grab and move wood in the fire, spread coals nicely to make a bed of coals easily etc. Cheap and fire proof.

 

1/02/2020 8:10 pm  #10


Re: Fire Gloves

PaPaddler wrote:

I use cheap leather work gloves...but I soak them in the lake first.  Figured this out after a rainy day paddle - we built a big fire at the site to warm up and dry off and I realized the wet gloves allowed me to grab anything.  A hot pot is no problem, a burning log or the hot grate can even be handled quickly.  

Carefull with this technique as wet gloves will transfer heat to skin allot quicker than dry gloves. As long as you're not handling it for long I'm sure you're ok.  A decent leather work glove or welding glove is the best I've found.

 

1/03/2020 1:39 pm  #11


Re: Fire Gloves

Thanks Shayne, but I respectfully beg to differ.  The moisture in the gloves will turn to steam when exposed to extreme heat and create a thin layer that, eventually, will be breached but extends the time of contact (much like if you lick your finger then very briefly touch a piping hot pan - the moisture evaporates so that your skin doesn't burn as readily). 

Now, I'm likely splitting hairs here as each medium (dry leather or wet leather) provides ample insulation for any short-term contact (just as you said), but I've found the wet to be very effective.  I'll make a point to field test a dry and a wet next time and see which one provides better insulation longer...and hope I am right!  

I do have some welding gloves but they are bulky and heavy in comparison - not something worth taking into the interior.  The leather gloves I often wear when paddling to protect my hands and to keep warm on cool days.

 

1/04/2020 8:07 am  #12


Re: Fire Gloves

Pa, any welder will beg to differ! that layer of steam dissipates the instant you grab something hot because it's direct contact, which leaves no airspace for steam to fill. Liquid water is an excellent heat conductor, but dry leather isn't- that's why welders always have extra gloves on hand.

 

1/06/2020 10:59 am  #13


Re: Fire Gloves

I'm no welder, that's for sure!  Field testing will be conducted when the ice thaws!

 

1/06/2020 3:14 pm  #14


Re: Fire Gloves

I usually just burn my hands . .then wonder why I never bring gloves … 

 

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