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Trip Reports » 4 Days on Chibiabos with My Son » Yesterday 9:36 am

PaPaddler
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Looks beautiful, as usual with your photographic skill!

As far as the bannock or any item that is done on the outside but doughy in the middle - a little lower heat and longer cook time usually provides thorough baking.  Tough to do on a burner, perhaps a bit easier over coals...but not a raging fire for sure.

Equipment » Solo trip - canoe type? » 8/11/2020 6:25 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 9

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I don't think that for most paddlers an asymmetrical hull design is going to give substantially more difficulty than the wind will unless you are paddling in a dead calm.  One can also adjust the hull design impact by sitting off-center so the canoe is somewhat 'tipped' over to one side - this alters the section of hull that is in contact with the water, removes most of the impact of a keel (if there is one) and makes the boat much more responsive because you've created a massive rocker.  Not something I'd do on a windy day, but on a calm day it would remove asymmetrical hull design from the equation.

Bottom line for most people, paddling a tandem canoe backwards while sitting in the front seat is the most elegant solution.

Skills » Identifying animal scat » 8/07/2020 12:41 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 7

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The very loud single splash was likely a beaver slapping its tail as a warning to other beavers and as a mechanism to distract possible prey.  If you startle a beaver or get it cornered in water, it will often slap its tail as part of the getaway process.

How fresh were the moose droppings?  Warm?  Salty flavor?

Trip Planning » Occupied Sites » 8/04/2020 6:12 am

PaPaddler
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Not on a lake with a single site but on Carcajou Bay, with four sites and we had two reserved.  Squatters were set up on the nice point site - family of four - we talked to the two other occupied sites and they had permits for Carcajou.  Approached the squatters and he said they have a permit for Grand Lake and played dumb that the bay would naturally be part of the lake.  He got somewhat belligerent and asked us "what do you want us to do, pack up and leave?" which we responded "yes".  But he refused.

Fortunately, we were a 45 minute paddle from an access point and we went directly there to report the infraction.  Luckily, we ran into an AA board member at shore and he invited us to join them on their site on Grand Lake.  We did see the rangers visit their site in the morning...I hope they gave him a fine because the guy acted like an ass.

Equipment » Canoe pack » 8/03/2020 12:29 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 17

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I've used the SeaLine versions (110L, 70L) for a number of years and have generally been happy with them.  My first large one did suffer a strap separation from the body of the pack when I lifted it fully loaded with one strap to put it on.  They did replace it for free and ever since then I do baby them somewhat when putting it on and taking it off with a heavy load.  It hasn't been an issue with the 70L size since the amount of weight in those seems to be within the design limits of the materials.

I love the dry-bag security of knowing everything in there will be bone dry regardless of conditions.  We have found that packing the contents in other bags within the dry bag helps to maintain a sense of order so you don't end up with 70 or 110 liters full of a mishmash of 'stuff' all jumbled together.  I do miss not having pockets and storage spots that are easily accessible, but have found it forces you to think through "what will I need access to during the day?" and pack accordingly.

The version you shared looks like a nice blend of big security with some pocket access - it may just be that you can't swing it around on a single strap if fully/densely loaded.

Catch-all Discussions » scary rescue at high falls july 27th » 7/29/2020 12:53 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 6

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As far as the "well-oiled machine" comment I was referring to their actions in rescue operation collaboration.  The comment on costs was a separate topic...I would support the individual and their insurance be billed for at least a portion of that.  I'm not sure how that usually runs, but I expect that insurance companies get bills for at least some services in more common situations.  

These are the hazards of 'extreme' activities (extreme in quotes because remote Algonquin is probably considered extreme by 90% of the population but it's not BASE jumping extreme).

Catch-all Discussions » scary rescue at high falls july 27th » 7/29/2020 9:39 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 6

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Thanks for alerting, Swede.  Accidents can happen - it always pays to be extra, extra careful when in the backcountry.  She is fortunate that there were others around able to render immediate aid and to contact authorities as well.  The recognition of the collaborative effort of the rescuers sounds like they were a well-oiled machine.  I can't imagine the total cost of the time and equipment for that...

I agree, nvm, that is doesn't seem like she was swept over the falls based upon the story but the only thing that was completely clear was that it wasn't the waterslide.  I expect she was probably nosing around the overlook to the waterfall and slipped down that slope into the water below but no way of knowing without some detailed witness description.

Catch-all Discussions » ​Canoe Soliloquy » 7/28/2020 6:25 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 3

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Live in the moment, plan for the future but do not forget the past.

I passed my 85 pound aluminum Michicraft canoe on to an 18 year-old kid for $100.  I had picked it up used, hand painted the camo pattern with my daughter using leaves from the yard and put many miles on it mostly on the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania and as far away as Lavieille in Algonquin.  Safe, great utility, bomb-proof; could carry two guys, a dog and hunting/fishing gear all over the place.  But there comes a time to move forward.

Maybe give it as a gift to a young person as a means to introduce them to the sport?

Where In Algonquin? » WIA392 » 7/27/2020 6:03 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 37

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I hear you, Diana!  I so look forward to the milky way, stars and dark sky views that I now only book trips during half-moon or smaller phases (and really prefer the new moon).  We did one trip during a full moon and, while beautiful, it absolutely drowned out the stellar views.  On the plus side, you could walk around camp without a flashlight all night long!

Where In Algonquin? » WIA392 » 7/25/2020 9:45 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 37

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My gosh, I've stayed on the site in the narrows and then paddled right by that flag tree.  I knew it looked familiar, but just couldn't put two and two together.

Fret not over an extended WIA post - I enjoy the back-and-forth and the challenge of deciphering clues...even the dated ones!

Where In Algonquin? » WIA392 » 7/23/2020 12:39 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 37

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Justafleshwound Lake?

;-)

Trip Planning » Bonfield / Dickson portage » 7/23/2020 9:52 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 8

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Only issue with cutting through that campsite is if it is occupied - a polite request and explanation will likely permit passage through. 

I've never looked for or located the spring but there are a couple creek crossings along the portage that you could top off nalgenes (although the cart path circumvents those, there is a creek/lake along that route too).  You really would just need enough to get you through Dickson and Hardy's Bay which is likely just an hours travel so just don't rely on Dickson/Hardy water.

Trip Planning » Bonfield / Dickson portage » 7/23/2020 5:50 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 8

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I've never taken the cart path, but have gone round and round about the matter prior to past trips.  Here's where I landed:

If we are doing a loop trip, in through Proulx and out through the Dickson-Bonfield, I wouldn't even consider lugging a cart around for a trip where I use it 3% of the time.  If we are doing an in/out through the Dickson-Bonfield, I would at least give it consideration. 

In the end, the desire to do a loop trip disqualified any consideration of carting the trail.  The benefit of the loop also had us coming out over that portage when our load is lightest near the end of the trip.  Light gear and frugal packing expand your limitations.  I also recall thinking that we could paddle to the Wright campsite and pickup the trail there if we were doing the 'in/out' approach - cuts off a couple KMs.

Agree with Stainless - it's not a difficult portage in condition or elevation, it's pretty heavily traveled and well board-walked through the wet areas.  It is just simply longer than most.  I've done it four times - all in the month of May when it's probably a little more damp and buggy than summertime.

Trip Planning » the border » 7/22/2020 5:24 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 22

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Another difference between St. Regis and Algonquin is the campsites are hidden back in the woods away from the lakefront.  You get little to no view of the lake from your site and less wind on a hot summer evening.

There are a boatload of state managed boat-in campsites on the Saranac Lakes but, unfortunately, those are fully booked through August.  I would have at least a small concern with capacity/availability of first come/first served sites in the region - less concern in St. Regis as portages keep the crowds away, but greater concern in the easier accessed lakes (really just like Algonquin, in that sense).

Joe Schmoe is spot on about the hiking being excellent in the ADKs (although I don't think he's been to Colorado where they count how many 12,000+ foot peaks you've climbed vs. how many 4,000+ foot peaks in the ADKs).  The mountains are substantially different - the Rockies are often snow-capped, have more loose rock and are geologically immature compared to the hundreds of millions of years of weathering and glaciation that the ADKs have sustained. Nonetheless, the hiking is excellent, many opportunities for swimming holes, waterfalls, etc.

You may end up looking at some of the charming motels that dot the area - you can get a pretty cheap place on a lake in relative comfort as well.  If you get skunked trying to find a campsite that would be a possible plan B. 

It's not Algonquin, but it's a nice substitute in the unlikely event of a meteorite impact or global pandemic forces you to change your plans.  

Where In Algonquin? » WIA392 » 7/21/2020 5:57 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 37

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My apologies for derailing the direction.  My river guess was a tongue-in-cheek homage to the prior WIA.  It is quite clearly, in my opinion, NOT a river but appears to be a lake shoreline.

The flag tree looks familiar.  I've only done one northern route.  I'll guess big old Cedar Lake.

Where In Algonquin? » WIA392 » 7/16/2020 8:07 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 37

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I'll guess the Crow River.  I know it's wrong but feel obligated now.

Equipment » Securing vehicle keys » 7/16/2020 8:05 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 32

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Sorry, Tim, haven't seen them...will look for them next time through.

We packed up all our gear at our Opeongo put-in/take-out after a May fishing trip and drove seven or eight hours down to Scranton, PA where we had left my brother-in-law's car.  At that point he realized he had left his keys on a bench at the docks of Opeongo.  Regardless of where you put them, you still have to remember to pick them up.

Board footera

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