You are not logged in. Would you like to login or register?

Backcountry » What do you call it? Thunder Box? Outhouse? Sh**ter? Kaibo? » 2/24/2020 2:32 pm

CanoeClaire
Replies: 23

Go to post

Honey Run makes perfect sense. A manure wagon on the farm is called a Honey Wagon.

MooseWhizzer Dave wrote:

I generally go with thunderbox, but there are some names that I've wanted to use for for some reason haven't.  My two favorites of that category are "mailbox" (I'm going to go post a letter!) and "safe deposit box".  In high school my girlfriend's family had a cottage way up past North Bay somewhere, and had to deal with their own...leavings.  So when they had to boat the stuff out in whatever gross container they used, they called it a "honey run".  Not really a thunderbox euphemism there, but I always liked the image of them wrangling some heavy, nasty container of yuck off their island, onto a boat, and off to wherever that stuff was dealt with.

 

Equipment » Large Group water filter » 2/17/2020 11:06 am

CanoeClaire
Replies: 12

Go to post

We've tried both the Sawyer Mini and the not-Mini version. The mini served us well for years but got out-classed at about 5 people over 3 days. The not-mini version has picked up the slack. It's fast and has stood up to some big trips with lots of people and silty rivers. We do backflush it after each trip (and sometimes in the middle of trips if it gets slow). 

Trip Planning » Baden Powell Lake?? » 1/06/2020 2:02 pm

CanoeClaire
Replies: 3

Go to post

I paddled to Sunbeam via Vanishing pond a few years back. It was the fall and the water was JUST high enough to navigate the marshy areas with quite a few beaver dam pullovers. I remember being on the lookout for the off shoot to Baden Powell but never really clearly identifying it. 

Would be a fun explore but be ready to slog through the marsh quite a bit. Hopefully someone else has more recent intel. 

Campsite Cooking » Dehydrating Rice » 12/20/2019 9:53 am

CanoeClaire
Replies: 7

Go to post

kkosik wrote:

My wife dehydrates jasmine rice in our dehydrator on every trip, either by itself, or mixed with casseroles, burritos, etc..  She typically cooks everything in an Instant Pot to make it easier.  Plus, when you pressure cook chicken, you can easily shred it and dehydrate it and it will come back really well compared to other cooking methods.  Almost every Instant Pot recipe we've tried works well since it's basically all one-pot stuff that tastes good together.

We use a basic 4-tray Excalibur dehydrator that I got from Walmart a few years ago and the food always re-hydrates really well in ~20 mins after boiling.  I'm fairly certain she soaks the rice first to remove most of the starch before cooking, but then we just dehydrate like normal on parchment paper squares on the trays.  Sometimes she separates the beef/chicken from the meal, depending on what we're making but most of the time, it's just all in together.  She does break up any clumps once it starts firming up to make sure it dehydrates evenly.

We either cook in a single pot for canoe camping or re-hydrate with boiling water in a screw top Ziploc container in Reflectix-style cozies for backpacking with equally good results.  Even when bringing to a boil in a single pot, letting it sit for ~15-20 mins sealed in a cozy (or your toque) is the key to allowing the food to fully absorb the water.

I used to weigh before/after to get the water volume exact but have since evolved to just barely covering the food and adding more cold water after re-hydrating if it comes out too dry.  It makes it so much easier and eliminates the need for a measuring cup.  Plus, it is quicker to eat since a touch of cold water cools it down just enough not to scald you.

Another tip we've found is that if you're cooking right in the pot, it's best cold-soak for ~10 mins before you're ready to cook.  It ensures that even the harder to re-hydrate ingredients come back without having to simmer and waste fuel.[/qu

Equipment » Gear Upgrading » 12/19/2019 11:53 am

CanoeClaire
Replies: 18

Go to post

MooseWhizzer Dave wrote:

  (By the way, I saw a woman two years ago portaging a canoe with no painter and her hands at her sides.  The most perfectly balanced canoe I've ever seen.  I was soooo envious.)     

I can count on one hand how many times I have accomplished this and it always feels like Such A Huge Success! Never lasts more than 100 meters though. Def need to finally get a painter tied in this year. 

Campsite Cooking » Dehydrating Rice » 12/18/2019 11:00 am

CanoeClaire
Replies: 7

Go to post

I'm starting to think about planning for some longer trips and I have a Trinidadian chickpea curry recipe that I think will dehydrate really well. I'd like to stick to one pot cooking if at all possible. 

Anyone ever mix cooked rice in with the rest of your dish and dehydrate it all in one go? 

Any tips? Should I maybe only half cook the rice?
 

Equipment » Gear Upgrading » 12/16/2019 8:54 am

CanoeClaire
Replies: 18

Go to post

I'll have to get some of those for my father in law. He always spends a seemingly inordinate amount of time arrange hats and socks on his shoulders to maximize comfort when portaging. Your standard yoke pads for contoured yokes don't seem to meet his needs. Keep us posted if you hear about them releasing anything. 

Equipment » neck pain solution » 10/24/2019 4:19 pm

CanoeClaire
Replies: 8

Go to post

I've never been a fan of canoe packs for this exact reason. I find that without the frame of a more traditional hiking backpack, my shoulders and neck feel terrible. 

Are you a die hard canoe pack packer or would you consider a more traditional hiking pack? I always have my food, clothes and sleeping bag in dry sacks anyway so the added benefit of a completely waterproof pack has never been a big draw for me. 

If you are going to explore new packs, I'd go to a store with a good sales rep (I like Adventure Guide in Waterloo and some MECs have really good people) and have them fit the pack to you specifically. Pay close attention to how to position the load lifter straps. Those are the straps that go from the top of your shoulder to the top of the pack. I find when my load lifters or my chest strap get wonky, my neck gets sore. I also look for a sturdy hip belt and moves with me. This may be an issue more specific to hippy women so it may not be a high priority for you. https://cdn.boardhost.com/emoticons/cool.png

Campsite Cooking » Turkey Pot Pie Recipe » 9/13/2019 1:35 pm

CanoeClaire
Replies: 0

Go to post

As requested on the Fall Colours/Fall Tripping thread, here's my Turkey Pot Pie Recipe
Makes 4 servings
* Dehydrator required

At Home:
1. Dice and fry the following: 3/4 of an onion, 2 large carrots, 2 stalks of celery, 2-4 cloves of garlic in butter or oil until soft. Use less oil than you'd typically use to improve dehydrating process. Season with salt, pepper and thyme. (Optional additions: parsnips, zucchini, literally any other veg you've got in your fridge!)
2. Sprinkle on 1 tbsp-ish of flour and mix well.
3. Add chicken broth (maybe 2 cups, add enough to cover the veg) and cook until a stew-like consistency. Since you're making it to dehydrate, it's good to cook off some more moisture than you would if you were eating right away (less dehydration time!). 
OPTIONAL 4: Add in 2 cooked, shredded turkey breasts.*
5. Spread out your stew on parchment paper in your dehydrator. Set it and forget it! I think it usually takes 8-12 hours to fully dehydrate. It will come off in crumbly sheets. Store in a zip-top bag.

INSTEAD OF STEP 4: Cook 2 turkey breasts, seasoned to your liking. Dice it up and freeze it. Obvs this only works if you're going to eat it within 1-2 days of leaving the freezer. 

6. Prepare your biscuit topping. Mix 1 & 1/3 c. flour, 1 & 1/3 tbsp baking powder, 5 tbsps + an extra dash of powdered milk, dash of salt in a zip loc bag. I like to add some dried rosemary too. 

* I haven't dehydrated turkey before. I know canned chicken dehydrates best of all types of chicken (because it's been pressure cooked, I think) and it's absolutely critical that you shred it thoroughly to ensure good re-hydration. 

At Camp:
1. Rehydrate and heat your stew. Some people measure how much water was removed during dehydration, I just cover it with water, warm it up and add water as needed. Add your hopefully-thawed turkey at this point if you went that route. 

2. Add water to your bannock mix. Add much less water than you think it needs. Kneed it in the bag and ad

Trip Planning » Fall Tripping / Fall Colours - General Planning » 9/12/2019 8:48 am

CanoeClaire
Replies: 18

Go to post

Also, if anyone is tripping over Thanksgiving and they want my Turkey Pot Pie recipe, let me know! 

Requires a dehydrator. 

Trip Planning » Fall Tripping / Fall Colours - General Planning » 9/12/2019 8:47 am

CanoeClaire
Replies: 18

Go to post

Anyone have any experience with traffic during peak colours? I like to trip on Thanksgiving wknd and find this a good time to use Access points that I typically avoid in the summer due to crowds (Canoe, Smoke). We did Canoe lake access a few thanksgivings ago and saw barely anyone after the first portage. 

But last year I heard there were 2 hr+ wait times on HWY 60 because of the traffic that weekend and now I'm second guessing this choice. 

I know it won't be busy past a portage or two but I don't want to sit in stressful traffic before or after the trip. Any insight?

Catch-all Discussions » Ontario Parks Online Updates » 9/09/2019 8:23 am

CanoeClaire
Replies: 11

Go to post

This really changes the functionality of the jump off campsites at some access points. I've always liked the idea of using the jump off sites at Rain but then I remember I either need to get there before the office closes for a permit (in which case, I might as well paddle in) or drive that terrible road back into town before I leave in the morning. 

In the past, I've pitched a tent on the lawn of Canoe Algonquin in Kearney (with their permission when I'm renting a boat with them) when I've arrived late at night. But now we have our own boat and I don't know that they'd be cool with that for non-customers. 

Trip Planning » Has vanishing pond vanished? » 8/27/2019 10:13 am

CanoeClaire
Replies: 6

Go to post

Not a current report but we did this route 2 years ago at Thanksgiving and it was navigable. 

There were a few beaver dams we had to lift over and it wasn't a speedy journey but it's a cool section. 

We've had some pretty good rains this year so I can't imagine it's impassable. Hopefully someone has some more current info for you. 

Campsite Cooking » Powdered eggs » 8/19/2019 10:13 am

CanoeClaire
Replies: 4

Go to post

This is terrible news! I love the Hoosier Hill eggs for baking. I've never actually used them for straight up breakfast but they are perfect to make cakes, muffins, cornbread, etc in the backcountry. 

The HappyYak option will work with baking but if anyone has any other leads, let me know!

For others interested, our friends made us a homemade breakfast casserole that was awesome. She made a fairly standard breakfast casserole with ground pork sausage (not in sausage form), shredded hashbrowns, onions and eggs. After it was cooked, she dehydrated the whole thing. Looked pretty gross once it was re-hydrated but it tasted amazing!

Catch-all Discussions » Using Materials Found in the Park » 8/19/2019 10:04 am

CanoeClaire
Replies: 8

Go to post

This is neither a fire starter nor a first aid trick, but winter green is always a nice bonus on campsites. I like to chew a leaf for a bit to cool down. Some leaves can be more astringent than others so it can be a bit hit and miss but it's a legitimately nice way to cool off when the water your drinking isn't exactly cold. 

Catch-all Discussions » I need a name change. And you're the focus group. » 6/28/2019 10:03 am

CanoeClaire
Replies: 21

Go to post

Another vote for BullTinkle or MooseWhizzer!

Board footera

LNT Canada is a national non-profit organization dedicated to promoting responsible outdoor recreation through education, research and partnerships.