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Equipment » Rain Gear » 10/16/2020 4:53 pm

solos
Replies: 23

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I feel that waterproof breathables can be a good part of a clothing system but mostly they are good for low output activities like hanging around camp or walking the dog. Often I'll choose clothes that can shed some water but primarily they will keep me warm and/or dry fast.

Where In Algonquin? » WiA Algonquin 399 » 10/16/2020 4:27 pm

solos
Replies: 29

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Are you leaving a "dead-end" lake?

Trip Reports » (Video) Welcome to Louisa » 8/28/2020 2:18 pm

solos
Replies: 9

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Nice video and nice detailed view of your J-stroke. Personally I never took a liking to the J-stroke because it felt weird to push the paddle in a way that wan't driving the canoe forward. On the other hand, your technique looks much more clam and elegant than mine. 

Catch-all Discussions » Hay Creek Road? » 8/15/2020 11:52 pm

solos
Replies: 8

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Is the road from Whitney to Cauliflower Lake really so bad that you need a 4x4 or will you see a Nissan Sentra parked at the access point when you arrive? It’s not hard to find pics of a guy driving his minivan on Hay Creek Road so I think it’s a valid question. I know that when I drove into the Stull Creek access in Temagami I literally had some guy in a 4x4 pickup looking down at me saying “I don’t know if you make it in that” (Chevy Caviller), but we did.

Trip Planning » Tips on sleeping in a tent with a 1 yr old? » 8/15/2020 11:38 pm

solos
Replies: 9

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The trend these days is to not have infants sleeping with loose blankets or bedding, lest they suffocate (i.e. SIDS).  Previously we went in mid-September and the typical sleep sacks that we used at home and possibly a toque was sufficient for warmth. If worse came to worse then the kid would have been snuggled tight with her mother. We thought that a tiny pop-up tent (~$30 from Walmart) that we could put inside the tent would help to contain the kid from rolling around where we didn’t want her but she didn’t like it. Who knows, that might work for you.

Maybe the new kid will like the pop-up tent that his sister didn’t, but I’m not holding my breath because he’s a mama’s boy that likes to be held. Wife says it won’t be enjoyable to go into the back county until he has sufficient neck control so I’m hoping that happens before it gets too cold in early October. I think it’s best to bring the kids out ASAP.

Equipment » Canoe pack » 8/07/2020 2:03 pm

solos
Replies: 20

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scoutergriz wrote:

Solos, there are a ton of canoe packs with standard internal frame harnesses now, making them the best of both worlds- suspension and fit of an internal frame, but height and volume of a canoe pack.
I use an old Oasis pack made by Woods (sadly no longer made), it's ballistic nylon, has a fantastic harness, and isn't water proof, anything that needs to stay dry is in drybags, and the rest is in plain stuff sacks. I've seen far too many waterproof packs fail  mid trip, whether it's from seams letting go, or tearing the fabric on a sharp rock or stick to ever trust them to protect my gear. With my system, if I damage the pack, I can whip out a needle and thread and sew it up well enough to continue my trip. Those coated packs are an abomination to repair in the field.

Maybe one day I'll try out a canoe pack because when the kids get bigger It may help to neatly fit things in the canoe, But I don't think I'd ever trust one to keep the down sleeping bags dry.

I think I'd like to get an Eberlestock F1 Mainframe but it costs at least $250 US which is too much for something I don't know if I'll like. Instead, I opted for an el-cheap-o Stansport Freighter, which is surprisingly comfortable (for the money) and hasn't yet failed under several heavy loads.

Skills » Identifying animal scat » 8/07/2020 1:49 pm

solos
Replies: 7

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papabear wrote:

1)  Does this sound like moose scat?
2)  Is 60 feet too close for comfort?
3)  If it was a moose, what problems could that pose?

Yes, that sounds like moose scat. Deer is similar but smaller and maybe rounder. I think it's hard to walk for more than 100 m in Algonquin without seeing a large turd pile.

We once arrived at a site just as the last light disappeared and in the dark you could hear my dog cheerfully eating something that looked like fresh berry infused bear poop right in camp. It's nothing to worry about. There are around 2000 bears in Algonquin so one is never very far away. Just don't give them any food (intentional or not) and things will be fine. I've seen zero bears in Algonquin but dozens of bear turds.
 

Equipment » Canoe pack » 8/03/2020 10:33 pm

solos
Replies: 20

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AlgonquinLakes wrote:

I bought a Chemun canoe pack last year and a few trips in I can say pretty unequivocally that I’m not a fan. The stitching connecting the shoulder strap to the bag gave way last year on trip #3 and I’ve never liked the way it sits.  So I’m looking for canoe pack recommendations. What do people use?

 
I’ve never used a proper canoe pack but I’ve never liked the look of the design. They don’t seem very comfortable or supportive compared to a proper backpack, like the huge MEC Serratus one I bought around 97 or so and still use to this day. It’s not ideal because it does get wet but I read an excellent article by an experienced backpacker that outlined how it’s inevitable that your pack will get wet or even soaked. It’s just a matter of how waterproof you make the various components of your packing system, according to the risk associated with that equipment getting wet. Towards that end I have started experimenting with a frame backpack that I can easily strap bags of varying waterproofness. I think this will work for me in the long run because I usually have more bulk rather than weight and I hope this system will be better for carrying all these bulky items. For sure it won’t fit as neatly into a boat as a canoe pack, but it should be easier to haul it on land, when you are typically working a little harder.

Trip Planning » Occupied Sites » 8/03/2020 10:05 pm

solos
Replies: 7

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papabear wrote:

Has anyone encountered a situation where you've reserved the only site on a lake and found it occupied when you've arrived?  Wondering what the protocol is.  Thanks!

There is no protocol. If you have a permit then they shouldn’t have an issue with you coming ashore and setting up. Who knows, they may be just packing up or stopping for a break. If they intend on spending the night then likely they have a good reason. If it were me I’d talk to them and assess the situation then decide to stay or seek other options.
I wouldn’t except that they would leave if they didn’t intend to. However, if the situation were a little reversed and I was already on the site with valid permit then I’d be very resistant to accepting guests.

Trip Reports » Rosebary Basecamp | In Search of Moose » 7/24/2020 9:04 pm

solos
Replies: 12

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Looking for moose is about as productive as seeking happiness. If you ignore the search and just go into the middle of the park you’ll find yourself surrounded.

Trip Reports » Kiosk to Biggar and back » 7/24/2020 9:00 pm

solos
Replies: 6

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Sometimes you hear the thunder for an hour or more before the rain and other times it’s just a few minutes. A big thunderstorm under a secure tarp is beautiful but paddling in the middle of a big lake would really suck!

Trip Planning » Mubwayaka to Tim Lake » 7/18/2020 11:56 pm

solos
Replies: 9

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Abe Froman wrote:

Thanks solos, will definitely be single carrying!

This week we added 8 pounds 4 ounces To our portage weight but the plan is still to single carry. It’s just so much better!

Where In Algonquin? » WIA392 » 7/18/2020 11:48 pm

solos
Replies: 37

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A sunrise on Narrowbag Lake?

Equipment » Securing vehicle keys » 7/18/2020 10:19 pm

solos
Replies: 32

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There is not much usefulness in carrying your keys. They just add to the weight and the worry of keeping them safe. The trick is to find a good stash spot that you remember, preferably not on or in your vehicle.

Trip Planning » Best Access Point » 7/12/2020 7:18 pm

solos
Replies: 30

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papabear wrote:

...It's just me and my little one (9 years old)...

 
9 years old. I think the kid could walk. My almost 3 year old handles steep and rough terrain with surprising agility and she easily manages several hundred meters without a break and many times that if she is inspired or excited.

Trip Planning » Wow, the backcountry is overrun! » 7/12/2020 7:10 pm

solos
Replies: 14

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Ontario has quite a big population and a surprisingly high percentage of people I’ve met have some experience with backcountry canoeing. Now when all these people are prevented from travelling outside the country then perhaps it’s no surprise that Algonquin is super busy despite foreign tourists not visiting the park. After all, who canoes more then us Canadians?

Trip Planning » Mubwayaka to Tim Lake » 7/07/2020 8:24 pm

solos
Replies: 9

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Abe Froman wrote:

Thanks for the info Corey, much appreciated. So you went from Mubwayaka to Tim in 4 hours? Jeffs map is showing around 8 hours, if I can do it less than 8 hours I will just run the distance in one day

 Jeff’s Map gives 4:20 for single carries and 8:10 for doubles. Also, I feel Jeff’s Maps overestimates the time needed to transition from paddling to portage so doing this in less than 4 hours is very feasible.

Board footera

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