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Trip Planning » Talk to me about Unicorn Hill » Yesterday 9:54 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 16

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solos wrote:

What would really worry me is a portage so steep that you couldn’t climb up or you’d slip back for lack of traction. I sometimes encounter that in my local woods when it’s icy or muddy and it really sucks to have to crawl up the hill on all fours. Haven’t experienced that yet in Algonquin but I did once look at, in passing, the 45 m portage on the Islet Lake railway embankment. Jeff recommends 30 minutes+ to traverse that.

Often on steepest uphills one can drag the boat by a painter. But the real danger is falling backwards while carrying a heavy backpack - if there's nothing behind to break the fall then you are in trouble! Of course Unicorn hill is not in this league. It's not even steep enough to deserve a name, just longish.

Skills » Tip for single carry in Solo boat » 6/04/2020 2:38 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 3

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Some yoke pads are better at giving extra clearance than others. Flat pad attached to yoke by velcro, the one you will probably get at the outfitters, will give almost nothing while Minnesota-style block-style pads will add 3 to 4 inches.

Fitness » Isolation fitness » 4/22/2020 1:59 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 9

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TripperMike wrote:

I've started doing squats at home while holding my 10 month old son.  I usually take him for a walk every morning that I'm home, around 6 -10 km.  Starting to consider putting some weight into a hiking pack haha. 

I did the same carrying my kid in a carrier for his first 3 years and it got me in better shape at 60 than I was 20 years ago. It also helped with getting him comfortable in the woods, rain or shine, so canoe trips feel for him like a natural thing to do. (Also, carrying ankle weights on my walks, 20lbs combined, was very helpful.)
 

Trip Planning » To paddle....or not. » 4/06/2020 1:58 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 109

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We go daily for a family bike ride in a park next to our town. To get to the park we have to drive through the town, potentially seen by hundreds of people. Is it insensitive to those who are sick and can't go outside? Those in hospitals? Those who dyed?
If so - is it sensitive to devoid those who can go outside of this possibility? The park is full of hikers and bikers on weekends and even on weekdays - though less so. Some of these people I know - and some of them, I know, lost their jobs. We greet each other with a smile and short talk, staying at a distance. “Why are you out there at a time like this?”  Because we are human and  - just may be - staying human is more important than being sensitive?
P.S. we leave in northern New Jersey, the area 2nd to New York city in number of Covid-19 cases in the US.

Equipment » Footwear? » 2/27/2020 2:19 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 23

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I hate water shoes - they tend to suck in small pebbles that will then grind your feet on the portage. I acknowledge that there are landings and portages in Algonquin where water shoes could be comfortable - and this is where you meet the biggest crowds.. Alternatively one has to dry-foot - not only the landings but also wet spots on portages, and that requires lots of energy, especially in wet season (last May my dry-footing partner had to paddle across some pools, which I walked through). Dry-footing ins and outs of 18/5' ultra-light canoe is cumbersome and more or less futile. I wear  comfortable non-waterproof hiking boots during the day (in icy water I will put on gor-tex socks or NEOS overshoes) and I change for light waterproof sneakers on a campsite.

Trip Planning » new reservation system » 2/26/2020 1:58 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 72

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MartinG wrote:

To each their own. 24 km including 9 portages, totaling 7495m. Downhill, with the wind, with the current, not crossing Cedar. 4 hours of paddling at a very reasonable 4km/hour. 3 hours portaging at an even more reasonable 2.5km/hour.

One can't safely reason with unmaintained portages and there are some on this route if I'm not mistaken. It might be 2.5/hr, but it might be a wee slower than that and require an extra day and some tools to negotiate. I remember unmapped logjam on the Nip - I was lucky that someone before me cleared a rough path through alders around it, but it still took me about an hour to negotiate less than a 100 meters.
 

Trip Planning » new reservation system » 2/24/2020 5:47 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 72

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SmedleyCo wrote:

So my point (finally) is that despite all the best intentions, shit happens.

I have no basis to judge the intentions, only what happens. And the logic leads to most obvious conclusion that the intentions are of the same quality as their consequences.
 

Trip Planning » new reservation system » 2/20/2020 2:00 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 72

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IanTendy wrote:

I just wanted to be able to print out my permits at home...

Then welcome to Temagami parks. Unless you are single boat of course.
 

Trip Planning » Advice on Northern Loop - starting at Kioshkokwi » 2/15/2020 6:43 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 8

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The original loop, especially if done in opposite direction, is totally manageable for people in decent shape. My wife and I did Nadine to Skuce in 4 hours single-carry - and we are far from being sportsmen. It's not easy, there are still some hills, but don't allow local lore to drive your decision-making process - you might regret it. Heart attack my lower back.

Trip Planning » newbie questions » 2/15/2020 6:32 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 29

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I understand that you will be single-carrying, otherwise times do not make sense. Jeff's estimates are  reasonable - on average, of course. I will take day 3 at 4 hours with a grain of salt (but not too big a grain) - these are tough portages, hilly and long. Sunfish could be overgrown with vegetation and re-eally slow late in the season, plus you'll have to paddle Hogan in the afternoon against predominant winds (unless you decide to camp in Parks bay). Altogether it's a perfect loop you are planning. Could be done in 4 longer days if one's in a hurry.

Trip Planning » The Nip campsites below Remona portage » 2/14/2020 6:48 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 3

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Thanks for advise, very helpful. Didn’t want t go to Nadine for it adds 1.5km of hilly portage on top of another 3km that day, but looks like there’s no other choice.

Trip Planning » The Nip campsites below Remona portage » 2/13/2020 10:02 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 3

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We will be traveling 6 people, including 2 small kids, with a dog and two large tents (3- and 4-person). Anyone  who's familiar with sites at Osler marsh and Nadine portage please help: will such a band feel comfortable at one of these sites? Are they spacey? For a reference: I'm trying to break a route between Robinson and Osler in two halves.
Cheers,
Sergey

Equipment » rental canoe options » 2/13/2020 5:24 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 11

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As a family of 3 we paddle 18.5 Keewaydin and happy with it. It's a lean fast and narrow boat with 32" mid-ship. Our 2-seat super-light kevlar model weighs about 45lbs, but of course rental fleet tends to be heavier with all repairs, skid plates and what-not.
When our son was still a toddler and required more attention, I could easily paddle Keewaydin solo from the stern, fully loaded for week-long trip. Huge change comparing to our previous 36"-wide Kipawa - and my guess Temagami is even wider, slower and more stable than that.

Catch-all Discussions » Flat rate per site coming soon? » 2/07/2020 7:49 am

EddyTurn
Replies: 56

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John Connelly wrote:

As Algonquin is still a bargain ... maybe some less fortunate will be forced to spend more time paddling the Gonq .....what a shame to have to make such sacrifices .

Sacrifices are not shameful. Requiring and cheering people to make them is shameful.
 

Catch-all Discussions » Flat rate per site coming soon? » 2/06/2020 1:57 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 56

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TripperMike wrote:

I'm all for increased cost's due to maintenance needs and inflation, but a per site fee does not make any sense.

This argument might make sense if there was maintenance, which in Temagami is not the case. I do not see any rhyme or reason to triple a price for almost non-existent services in an under-used area with almost non-existing enforcement. Even if  there are more rangers than bigfoot in Temagami, this difference is negligible.

Trip Planning » AP fees » 2/06/2020 1:35 pm

EddyTurn
Replies: 2

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Thanks, Shawn.

Trip Planning » AP fees » 2/06/2020 9:21 am

EddyTurn
Replies: 2

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I hate to bring this topic up, but is it the right time now to start saving for this summer trip? There's news of Temagami parks hiking up nightly backcountry fees to flat $36, regardless of party size. Which is kind of cute considering that Temagami parks do almost no maintenance in the backcountry. Is it what's happening with AP fees as well?

Board footera

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