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3/21/2017 1:55 pm  #52


Re: How do you solo trip without freaking out?

Yup.  I actually posted it shortly after the trip.  9/21/2016, Weekend on David Lake.  I am very windy when I write, so put your feet up and enjoy reading about Carrion Beetles.   And more.

 

3/21/2017 2:19 pm  #53


Re: How do you solo trip without freaking out?

Ah... you posted it when I was busy feeling sorry for myself because an injury ended my camping season. Reading it now!

 

3/21/2017 6:59 pm  #54


Re: How do you solo trip without freaking out?

Uppa wrote:

...the absolute best thing about solo tripping is being on your own schedule. I book routes that I want to do, at the pace I want to do them, and spend my time however I choose. Sometimes that's wandering around with the camera, sometimes it's lying on a rock by the water's edge, thinking and doing absolutely nothing. I get up when I want, eat when I want, move camp when I want...

That about sums it up for me. Having solo backpacked for years I wasn't concerned about the psychological effects of soloing. Talking and dealing with people almost constantly in my working life, I cherish alone time. 

In regards to portaging, I subscribe to kayamedic's school of thought - It's an unwarranted risk. I'd much rather enjoy the walk and the opportunity to stretch the legs. I know Corky the Wonder Dog enjoys the portages. Canoeing to her is something to be endured, not enjoyed, and is preferable only to being left behind. She'd much rather be backpacking.


Dave
 

3/21/2017 8:58 pm  #55


Re: How do you solo trip without freaking out?

Algonquintripper wrote:

Uppa wrote:

...the absolute best thing about solo tripping is being on your own schedule. I book routes that I want to do, at the pace I want to do them, and spend my time however I choose. Sometimes that's wandering around with the camera, sometimes it's lying on a rock by the water's edge, thinking and doing absolutely nothing. I get up when I want, eat when I want, move camp when I want...

That about sums it up for me. Having solo backpacked for years I wasn't concerned about the psychological effects of soloing. Talking and dealing with people almost constantly in my working life, I cherish alone time. 

I love the planning/moving on your own schedule aspect, but that can also be done with a small group, depending on the people. If they're not big trippers and you're the trip leader, then you'll be calling all the shots anyways.

My top 3 favourite things about going solo (in no particular order) would be planning/moving on your own schedule, paddling a solo boat, and the sense of accomplishment.

 

3/28/2017 6:19 am  #56


Re: How do you solo trip without freaking out?

Having gone solo for the past 10 years, I have no problem with it.....YOU JUST TALK TO YOURSELF! and any other tripppers you meet.  As stated above, you have to be extremely careful in what you do as there possibly could be no one around.  One thing I always worry about is my appendix which I still have.  What do I do if I have an appendix attack????  Good question!!  Taking a survival course like I have a few times will add to your solo experience.  Your first night might be freaky, but after that you really don't care about what goes bump in the night.  If noises in the bush around your tent keep you awake and make you a little skittish, ear plugs is the solution.  Most people don't realize that solo and tripping with others could very well be dangerous to your health if something should happen.  There is a hill from Little Nadine Lake up to Little Osler lake called Heart Attack Hill (totally climbs really uphill all the way and near the top you can see Erables Lake so you are really up high.  Anyways, many years ago (I think around late 70's) a man died on this portage from a heart attack, thus the name is has now.  I have done this portage a few times and it isn't easy to say the least.  But the fishing is good in Little Osler Lake and Osler Lake for speckled trout.  After you have a few solo trips under your belt, tripping with others is basically out the window as going soloing, you can do what you want, when you want, and how you want without agreeing with others.  I also take a little pocket radio with ear plugs that I can listen to at night sometimes if I can get reception.  But a little small radio is helpful for the weather.  If it is going to pour the next day, stay where you are, etc.  If you can get the weather forecast on CBC somewhere in the Park, it is easier for you to decide when to go and when to stay.


Tripping in Algonquin Park is not about seeking shelter from a storm, tripping in Algonquin Park is about dancing in the rain!
 

3/28/2017 7:01 am  #57


Re: How do you solo trip without freaking out?

It just dawned on me a couple of other points I should have stated in my previous post.  Number 1 is your canoe.....always tie it to a tree at night.  Many people just pull it up on shore and turn it upside down and leave it there.  A very windy night could very easily take your canoe out on the lake and you wake up the next morning and say "where is my canoe" and now you are, well....you know where you are! lol  And this has happened a number of times to other trippers I have come in contact with while tripping.   Number 2 is whether soloing and/or with a group, if you ever get caught in a violent windstorm when you are on a campsite, many people head for the tent to get out of the wind and rain, etc.  BAD DECISION....that is the worst thing you can do. If you are sleeping in your tent and you wake up to a violet wind storm, get out of it.   If you go into your tent during a violent wind storm, you have lost sight of your surroundings and now should a tree start coming down on your tent, well, you will probably be hurt and possibly killed.  Many people in Algonquin Park have had this happen to them.  Best thing to do is to stay out of your tent, perhaps under a tarp you have put up previously near a fire, and obviously not being near a tree if there is lightning.  Put on your rain suit, sit on a chair in a wide opening on your sight if you don't have a tarp up, and watch the "show".  Nothing wrong with getting a little wet than having a tree fall on your tent when you are inside it.


Tripping in Algonquin Park is not about seeking shelter from a storm, tripping in Algonquin Park is about dancing in the rain!
 

4/03/2017 5:13 pm  #58


Re: How do you solo trip without freaking out?

CanoeClaire wrote:

I have even followed one tripper (can't remember the link now) who has a stuffed animal that goes along on all his adventures. He entertains himself by taking its picture in strange places. 

Claire - are you talking about Kermit's Wilderness Adventures?

If it is, Phil is a really nice guy - I've tripped with him before - and Kermit was right there with us too!


Edit: Also - to address the question of the thread. Just get out there and do it! If you don't like it, call it a day and head home (or call a friend to come meet you and continue the trip) if you do like it, then have at 'er! Mind over matter. What is mind? Doesnt matter. What is matter? Nevermind. 

Last edited by Peek (4/03/2017 5:15 pm)

 

4/04/2017 8:32 am  #59


Re: How do you solo trip without freaking out?

Peek wrote:

Claire - are you talking about Kermit's Wilderness Adventures?
 

It wasn't Kermit. it was someone section hiking in Great Britain somewhere I think. I can't find it anymore. But now I am excited to read all about Kermit's travels!

 

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