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1/18/2016 4:09 pm  #1


Winter weather patterns and spring bug populations

I've been wondering if the soft start to this winter and its low snow levels might have an impact on the bug situation come spring time.

I've poked around the internet and come up with some 'mosquito facts' of which I hadn't been aware, pertaining to "Winter Eggs and Frozen Larvae"... http://www.mosquitoreviews.com/mosquito-cold.html

But even with these facts at hand, I'm still unsure as to how to speculate about how this spring's bugs could be.

It seems that a dry winter and reduced spring melt could mean that black flies would be less numerous, since they need running water to breed? ... http://www.muskokaregion.com/opinion-story/3580439-everything-you-didn-t-want-to-know-about-black-flies/

Any sage wisdom on these matters?
 

 

1/28/2016 11:33 am  #2


Re: Winter weather patterns and spring bug populations

A bit of what we see happening on the farm fields. Due to new government regulations for spraying crops, we now have to scout fields for larvae of different species in the fall, instead of waiting to find the adults in spring. I have noticed a lot of grubs from different species of beetles, but especially Japanese beetles ( these grubs are the ones often  in your lawn). We also see cutworms etc buried about 6" deep, they will go deeper if it turns cold, but currently in the open fields with hardly any frost in them, the soil will warm up early if it gets sunny, and if not more snow arrives, the fields will also dry up quicker, thereby bringing bug populations to the top. So, if nothing much changes the rest of this winter I would think early ice out and warmer then usual temps may very well may mean early bug cycles.

 

1/28/2016 6:10 pm  #3


Re: Winter weather patterns and spring bug populations

i think that  low or little snow fall this winter, is good for the tick populations, bad for the moose populations this spring.

 

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