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11/28/2015 6:32 am  #1


New Camera!

Just bought a Canon Rebel SL1 on sale for $450, regular price is around $700. I've only ever use point and shoot style Canon cameras but have always wanted to get a good DSLR. It came with the Canon EF-S 18-55 IS STM lens which I am assuming is a decent all around lens for picture taking similar to that of the point and shoot I'm used too. I would like to get a better zoom lens before spring for better wildlife shots though.
It is my understanding that dust inside the camera can become an issue when removing lenses often? I am assuming when I'm not using the camera I should always keep the lens on it correct? Even when transporting in its case?
How often do I have to bring the camera in to have the sensor/mirror cleaned? It has the auto cleaning feature which I have seen come on a few times already. Thanks for all the help and I am very excited to get used to this!

This is basically exactly what I bought but I bought it at The Source. I also bought a Canon Carry case which came with an extra battery for $50.
http://www.amazon.ca/Canon-Rebel-Digital-18-55mm-Lens/dp/B00BW6LY2Y/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1448710349&sr=8-1&keywords=canon+sl1

Last edited by token (11/28/2015 6:33 am)

 

11/28/2015 8:24 am  #2


Re: New Camera!

That's a good entry-level DSLR. Glad to see you got the "IS STM" kit lens and not the "Non-IS" version which is still being retailed here-and-there. The "IS" denotes Image Stabilization which is purported to reduce "shake' by up to 4 f-stops. Keep the IS turned on, unless you're using a tripod (when it becomes counter-productive).

 

11/28/2015 8:59 am  #3


Re: New Camera!

I have read allot of reviews and many of them mention it being 'entry level'. I am just curious what makes it entry level? Lack of features? Lens? I dedicate most of the time I'm in the woods to photography so I'm now wondering if I should return this one and get something a step up?

     Thread Starter
 

11/28/2015 9:45 am  #4


Re: New Camera!

Entry level means suitable for a beginner... having a "pro" or "professional" label somewhere on the camera doesn't guarantee that photos will be better but this sort of thing does sell to consumers, whether the upgrading is needed or not.

Some of the most valuable photos are shot with pretty basic gear... in many instances it's being there to get the shot that really counts. OTOH if technical perfection is your goal, than maybe you should be spending more $$$... your call.

PS... some here might have seen BeaV's BC - Alaska vids formerly at the Boundary Waters website which were shot with a simple waterproof P&S... basic, nothing too advanced and one of the best set of vids I've ever seen, raw and real, no fooling around with technical details.

 

Last edited by frozentripper (11/28/2015 9:56 am)

 

11/28/2015 1:44 pm  #5


Re: New Camera!

To be accurate, the term "Entry Level" in this context means suitable for those beginning to use a Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera .. not for those beginning to use any camera.

In reference to the Canon Rebel SL1, the term "entry level" means it is built with less features than otherwise similar DSLR cameras in the APS-C sensor size category.

To keep comparisons limited in number, I'll refer you to 3 cameras in the Canon line of APS-C sensor size cameras .. your EOS Rebel SL-1, the EOS 70-D and the EOS 7D Mark II .. all viable choices able to take the same lenses and perform the same basic functions. Yes, your SL-1 is the "entry level" version of this line of cameras. While it doesn't have the same build-quality and feature-set as the others, it is markedly lighter, smaller and cheaper!

For a "UK-based" comparison of these three cameras, check out http://www.dpreview.com/products/compare/side-by-side?products=canon_eos100d&products=canon_eos70d&products=canon_eos7dii

If I were to want to replace my old EOS 40-D camera body, I wouldn't hesitate to buy a EOS Rebel SL-1 .. particularly for hauling around Algonquin .. on account of its lighter weight, smaller size and limited investment (cheaper).

So, bottom line is .. don't be put-off by the label of "entry level". And don't forget that should you acquire a telephoto zoom for shooting wildlife, it'll always fit one of the higher-end compatible Canon APS-C camera bodies that you may choose to invest in, in the coming years.
 

 

12/30/2015 5:58 pm  #6


Re: New Camera!

We bought the EOS Rebel T3 before our 23 day trip. We love it and are definately beginner photographers.

 

12/31/2015 4:54 am  #7


Re: New Camera!

ChristineCanoes wrote:

We bought the EOS Rebel T3 before our 23 day trip. We love it and are definately beginner photographers.

I was stuck between that one and the SL1. The T3 is a couple years newer but actually has less features and is a bit larger in physical size than the SL1. What sold me on the SL1 was higher ISO ranges which should mean more options for night shooting.

     Thread Starter
 

12/31/2015 5:00 pm  #8


Re: New Camera!

Hi Token,

I agree your camera is better. We simply went with the T3 because of price. I got it used with 2 lenses (reg and zoom). As far as the changing lenses go, we decided to take our point and shoot for 'reg' photos and used our T3 for zoom. So because we are real newbies, we decided to not deal with switching lenses.

 

3/23/2016 8:27 pm  #10


Re: New Camera!

It's always exciting getting new camera gear!  Enjoy it!!!

 

3/24/2016 4:42 pm  #11


Re: New Camera!

I use a Nikon D90, and have had it for several years.  (Last time I canoe-tripped I was using a film camera - another reason I can't wait to get to that park this summer), but I've taken the D90 on the canoe and hiking, camping, whatevering a LOT.  You don't need to worry about dust tooooo much.  It will happen, but unless you get a lot in there it won't interfere with mechanics and really won't bother the quality of the images.  Obviously anything on the lens has the potential to show up later, but it hasn't be a problem for me.  I know a lady who never puts the lens cap on her camera - which drives me nuts - but it works out just fine for her.  

For sure sure things to do:
always carry a spare battery, and be sure to use both of them in general.  They'll both continue to hold a charge pretty well that way.  If you leave one disused for a long period of time, it just won't last as long.

Get one of those little brushy things with the squeezie deal on it to blow dust away.  I think they call them lens blowers.  You can use microcloth or something like that, but if you've got dirt on there, you don't want to be rubbing it all over the lens and going "ohhhhh that's gonna leave a mark".

Very important - get a skylight filter (clear filter).  It will screw onto the end of your lens (well, I guess I don't know for sure on your camera - but worth looking into), and offers protection for your lens.  Mess that up and you can replace it.  Mess up the "glass" of the lens and uh-oh.  Maybe even a polarizing filter just for fun.....

Waterproof bag.  I never use the camera bag in the canoe or camping, it'll soak through from water in the canoe or water from above, plus the bags take up too much space.  I use a Seal Line waterproof bag, I don't remember 5 or 10 Liter.  I have used one for years.  The bags trap air, so that kind of cushions the camera from other things in the pack. 

Something to consider - the lens you are buying looks like a nice zoom - you could get a lens doubler, either a 1.5x or 2x.   You need a steady hand and/or a bright day, but in the right circumstances, that can get you in pretty doggone close, they don't weigh anything, they aren't particularly expensive, and they don't consume an inordinate amount of space (they don't add a terrible amount of length to the lens is what I mean).

Small tripod!  You can take awesome selfies with a mini-tripod.  (like really mini).

 

3/29/2016 6:59 am  #12


Re: New Camera!

I just got the lens and the bag in the mail yesterday! I'm so excited, I will have lots of fun with this stuff!
The bag actually comes with a rain cover that fits in a small pouch inside. You can cover the whole bag with it and cinch it at the bottom with draw-strings. I think I will try taking the whole bag on trips because I can store other things in there as well.. I used to always carry a fanny-pack with me at all times with some first aid stuff, glasses, batteries, and small useful items like that but I will just include that in the camera bag and ditch the fanny pack all-together. 

I really should probably order some filters like you said, that will be in my next Amazon order for sure!
I will always have 3 spare batteries in the bag and one in the camera, so that should last me for a week long trip I would think. 

Can I use the cleaning cloths that come with eye glasses to clean off the lens glass?

     Thread Starter
 

3/29/2016 7:39 am  #13


Re: New Camera!

Absolutely you can use those cleaning cloths.  Before those microfiber cloths they used to sell these little thin papery deals that did the same thing.  The only thing is you wouldn't want to use the cloth if you had things like a blob of soil (that could have tiny tiny pebble chips in it) on there or sand especially, because then you're just scratching up the lens.  You may be able to just blow that kind of thing off of there, or gently wipe it or whatever, the point is just to be mindful of what it is you're trying to get off the lens.  The blower thing blows air through a brush, and that usually can overcome the static death grip that some dust seems to want to have on a lens - but you can definitely do with out it.  I hardly ever use mine, but I like to have it in the case.  (my daughter dumped a pail full of sand on top of the camera one time.....biggest inhale ever......it took a while)

The batteries, at least mine, last a really long time.  Except the one that was involved in the mysterious case of the cross-threaded lemonade bottle in my carry-on that was on top of the camera....but even that one eventually dried out and functioned ok.  The only thing is they are kind of like laptop batteries in that if you don't  use them, they won't hold a charge as well.  So, not necessarily during your trip, but just in general, you would want to make use of all the batteries just to keep them active.

 

3/29/2016 8:10 am  #14


Re: New Camera!

dontgroandaddy wrote:

Absolutely you can use those cleaning cloths.  Before those microfiber cloths they used to sell these little thin papery deals that did the same thing.  The only thing is you wouldn't want to use the cloth if you had things like a blob of soil (that could have tiny tiny pebble chips in it) on there or sand especially, because then you're just scratching up the lens.  You may be able to just blow that kind of thing off of there, or gently wipe it or whatever, the point is just to be mindful of what it is you're trying to get off the lens.  The blower thing blows air through a brush, and that usually can overcome the static death grip that some dust seems to want to have on a lens - but you can definitely do with out it.  I hardly ever use mine, but I like to have it in the case.  (my daughter dumped a pail full of sand on top of the camera one time.....biggest inhale ever......it took a while)

The batteries, at least mine, last a really long time.  Except the one that was involved in the mysterious case of the cross-threaded lemonade bottle in my carry-on that was on top of the camera....but even that one eventually dried out and functioned ok.  The only thing is they are kind of like laptop batteries in that if you don't  use them, they won't hold a charge as well.  So, not necessarily during your trip, but just in general, you would want to make use of all the batteries just to keep them active.

Thanks for all the help! As for the batteries I am going to number them with a Sharpie and every time one dies ill use the next.
How often do you clean/have your sensor cleaned?

Last edited by token (3/29/2016 8:11 am)

     Thread Starter
 

3/29/2016 8:23 am  #15


Re: New Camera!

You'll need an extra battery for the Rebel.. It does go through them kinda quick in comparison to my 70D.

I started with a Rebel and the same lenses you have. Now the 55-250 is good for some shots, but wildlife is not usually one of them.  The trouble is that you need about a 400-700 mm lens to take shots identifiable as more than blob.

Be careful of your camera protection. The Rebel is an entry level camera meaning its cheap and while it looks comparable in features to the more advanced Canon cameras, the autofocus requires time and does not  sense as well. Also there is a lack of weatherproofing on it so be careful in the rain. 

I would not be too hopeful of sky shots yet. Its not the body of the camera, its that your kit does not yet have a fast lens.  You need one at 2.8 or so and a wide angle will be best. The 18 mm on  your kit lens is a slower lens. Try it but I got unhappy results with my Rebel..  

So I bought a special night sky lens. Its a manual lens but that is not a problem. I set it to 2.8 and infinity focus and the shutter speed to about 20 seconds.
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/769532-REG/Rokinon_FE14M_C_14mm_Ultra_Wide_Angle_f_2_8.html
 Some examples and an article
http://petapixel.com/2014/01/29/picking-great-lens-milky-way-photography/

You do have a tripod, no?  It seems we are bound to weigh you down but this is worth it
http://www.apple.com/shop/product/HJ2E2VC/A/mefoto-backpacker-travel-tripod-kit?afid=p238%7Cse9fEsGqP-dc_mtid_1870765e38482_pcrid_71771058370_&cid=aos-us-kwg-pla-btb-slid-

Welcome to the world of spending more money. I went from a Rebel t1 to a 70D and am anticipating the leap to a full frame camera with its way better sensor.

I have dark sky at home so I really don't tote all that stuff on a canoe trip.. I purchased yet another camera for wildlife shots. Its a bridge camera,, the Canon SX60. It is a great camera and I have gotten moose and eagle closeups. Its smaller than the Rebel with a  max zoom of 1300 mm equivalent. ( no way am I toting that big a real telephoto on a canoe trip

A filter in these days is nice in some cases... I got an ND filter for darkening the image allowing longer shutter times to show water movement.

 

3/29/2016 8:46 am  #16


     Thread Starter
 

3/29/2016 9:59 am  #17


Re: New Camera!

Token, I would be cautious about putting a cheap filter on any lens.  Cheap filters scratch easily and can degrade the quality of your images.  I use a UV filter on my lenses that cost about $100 each.  That's about middle of the road for filters.  They do offer good protection for your lens though.  Another piece of advise I would offer is to use a lens hood all the time.  The purpose of a lens hood is to add contrast in your images by mitigating lens flare on bright days, however I leave mine on all the time as they are just another layer of protection for your lens.  I had my 24-70 f2.8 on the front of my camera on a tripod and the tripod tipped over.  The camera landed square on the front of the lens.  It cracked my lens hood but that cost about $35 to replace as opposed to the $2500 for the lens had I not had the hood on.

As for cleaning the sensor, that is totally something you can do on your own.  Grab the proper sized cleaning kit (swab, etc) and give it a go.  There are lots of good videos on Youtube that will show you how.  It's a bit intimidating at first but honestly it is very easy to do.  How often you do it will depend on how much dirt you get on your sensor.  A good test is to crank up your aperture (f16 or higher) and take a shot of a clear sky.  In your image you will see all the bits of dust on your sensor if it is dirty.  If you swap lenses a lot outdoors you will have to do it more often.  Try to minimize lens swapping and if you do it, do it out of the wind and aim your camera down so that it makes it harder for dust and debris to get inside.  You can also get a blower which works well for cleaning looser bits of debris. 

 

 

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