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1/12/2019 10:02 am  #1


408-year-old tree discovered in Algonquin Park’s unprotected logging

todays front page of the toronto star is reporting that a 408 year tree has been discovered  in algonquin park`s unprotected logging zone near cayuga lake,, good read,, 
 i can not get the link to work?
   

 

1/12/2019 1:03 pm  #2


Re: 408-year-old tree discovered in Algonquin Park’s unprotected logging

 

1/12/2019 8:21 pm  #3


Re: 408-year-old tree discovered in Algonquin Park’s unprotected logging

Very interesting to read Swede and thanks Steve for posting the link.
The knowledge of that tree and many others of it's age in Algonquin is known , particularly by those in the AFA , referenced in that article . 
As a recreationalist like many others , it is amazing to read of such a wondrous tree !

Swede next time yer up Catfish way , take a paddle over to Luckless and walk the bush on it's North-East shore .
There are some grand giant hemlocks , beyond the shoreline buffer , and plenty larger than that in the CPAWS picture.

It is unfortunate that CPAWS continues to tell their lies , to instill fear in the GTA population that visits Algonquin Park and " cottage country ". It is one way they historically unscrupulously solicit support .
One of my many issues with that article is in what they " believe to be " is not based on fact .
This is actual fact from the AFA website provided on this forum .... in the Resource section .
" The total area of the Park is 7,635 km2 including water.  Less than 55% of that total area is available for forest harvesting on a periodic basis. Forest management activities are a permitted use only in the recreation/utilization zone. These activities are not allowed in wilderness, nature reserves, historical, natural environment or development zones or reserves for shorelines, portages, trails, etc."

" Harvesting activities take place on approximately 1% of the forested area of the Park in a given year."

Information , I think worthy of knowing , for all stewards of Algonquin Park .

Last edited by John Connelly (1/12/2019 10:13 pm)

 

1/13/2019 1:37 pm  #4


Re: 408-year-old tree discovered in Algonquin Park’s unprotected logging

That’s an interesting article. A reminder that the Park’s got some pretty awesome things hidden away (and not so hidden I guess).

John’s comment referenced the % of the Park’s total area that’s available to logging. Out of curiosity, anyone know the % of dry land?  Is that what the article is referencing when it says 65% is open to logging?

 

1/13/2019 3:37 pm  #5


Re: 408-year-old tree discovered in Algonquin Park’s unprotected logging

would that mean that ,65 % of the park has road access?,, if the article is correct,,

     Thread Starter
 

1/15/2019 3:45 pm  #6


Re: 408-year-old tree discovered in Algonquin Park’s unprotected logging

  If you ever look at google maps and look at the park (satellite) there are roads every where. Crazy how many roads there are. Way before google maps my buddy worked with the bear guy in the park. He told about all of the roads they would go on. Who knew..... 


I'm just gone Fishin!
 

1/15/2019 9:43 pm  #7


Re: 408-year-old tree discovered in Algonquin Park’s unprotected logging

Plenty of big trees too !
http://i1205.photobucket.com/albums/bb425/JAConnelly/DSC00085Small.jpg


 

Last edited by John Connelly (1/16/2019 6:21 am)

 

1/15/2019 10:15 pm  #8


Re: 408-year-old tree discovered in Algonquin Park’s unprotected logging

swedish pimple wrote:

would that mean that ,65 % of the park has road access?,, if the article is correct,,

Not at any given time really. 65% of the park is under a zoning designation within which the AFA can do commercial forest management, and within that roads are built as necessary for logging operations, and then decomissioned, eventually bridges are removed and the old roads are overgrown. And even those roads don't give "access" to anyone but the AFA and park staff, of course. But yeah, we've all crossed roads on portages, both current and partly overgrown.

 

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