LNT Canada is a national non-profit organization dedicated to promoting responsible outdoor recreation through education, research and partnerships.

You are not logged in. Would you like to login or register?

7/10/2018 7:55 pm  #18


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

First off - any time someone is asking about the rules my assumption is that they care about the rules and are trying to act responsibly within the rules. Secondly, while Provincial Parks staff have definitely been know to give inconsistent responses over the years, the Parks staff are in a position of authority whereas any response on a private discussion group is not. I can readily agree that in a case such as this, a written statement from Parks staff would be much more valuable than a verbal response. Ideally you would want that written response to be from the Park Superintendent or someone clearly identified as being authorized to respond on behalf of the Superintendent. 

The full rules are a little more complex than the 3 bullet summary that ShawnD posted. This Ontario.ca page is a good starting point: https://www.ontario.ca/page/outdoor-fire-restrictions That page includes the short summary but also provides greater detail directly on that page and more importantly links to the Forest Fire Prevention Act legislation and the Ontario Regulations 207/96: OUTDOOR FIRES which are part of the Forest Fire Prevention Act. The detailed rules are in section 8 of the Regulations. I'm not sure that most Provincial Parks can actually satisfy section 8.7 items 5 & 6. 

Candles are not specifically covered, so Uppa has a valid question of whether they would be acceptable during the fire ban. 

I know quite well how important a campfire is to my camping experience. Cooking marshmallows over the propane stove just isn't the same experience as roasting them over a fire. 

http://www.loonislandoutdoors.com/TripReports/LowerPetawawa/McManusLakeGallery/content/images/large/IMG_3874.jpg

 

7/10/2018 9:40 pm  #19


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

Man, this is a bummer.  I'm supposed to head out on the 20th, but I don't know if I want to go camping without the campfire.

Does anyone have experience with backcountry camping during a fire ban?  I'm still drawn to the beauty of the park and am open to the idea that camping sans fire offers its own unique experience.  

Off the top of my head I can think of the following alternatives to a "traditional" campfire:
- Electric candles
- The stars and moon
- Bunch of glow sticks taped together 
- Dayglo painted cardboard cut out of a fire + black light 
- Fireflies in a jar (catch & release)
- Ipad campfire app
- Reflection of a bear's eyes in my flashlight beam


 

 

7/11/2018 6:06 am  #20


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

It stays light out late anyways, just goto bed a little earlier and wake up a little earlier and enjoy the early morning. Most people don't realize how much more amazing the sun rise can be vs. the sunset. http://cdn.boardhost.com/emoticons/wink.png

Other than that my vote goes for extra mind alrtering substances.

Last edited by ATVenture (7/11/2018 6:07 am)

 

7/11/2018 7:19 am  #21


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

RobW wrote:

Another piece of information to highlight the serverity of the current fire risk in addition to the closures and evacuations of Finlayson Point Provincial Park and Marten River Provincial park, Lady Evelyn Smoothwater Provincial Park, also in the Temagami area is also closed due to fire risk. Not just a fire ban but closed.
 

I mean, just to clarify, these parks are closed due to the dangers caused by actual active fires in the area, not the risk of potential fires.

 

7/11/2018 7:29 am  #22


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

I was about to book a 3 day but gonna hold off for a bit.  collecting wood and having a fire is a big deal for the kids ...

Anyone hear of fire bans in any other park ?

 

7/11/2018 7:38 am  #23


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

This page shows the current fire ban state of all Ontario Parks. http://www.ontarioparks.com/alerts

Most parks in the same general area of Ontario have full fire bans as well. 

 

7/11/2018 7:59 am  #24


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

ATVenture wrote:

Other than that my vote goes for extra mind alrtering substances.

ATVenture, you nailed it right there. 

 

7/11/2018 8:12 am  #25


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

If you can't have an evening fire what about heading out for a night-time paddle.  That's always an enjoyable activity as I find the sounds of the Park get amplified as everything is so still and quiet.  Or a night hike along a portage?  It does suck that you can't have a fire as I totally agree it is such a great part of the overall experience.  But not worth risking losing part of the park to a fire.
What are some other night time activities folks do?

 

7/11/2018 8:30 am  #26


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

I’m not a huge fire guy. They’re certainly nice, but if I’m out solo I rarely bother with one. That said, it’s definitely a bummer not to have the option, especially with larger groups. I’m with Atventure on the go to bed early, up early suggestion. Sunrise > sunset in my books.

 

7/11/2018 8:33 am  #27


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

DanPM wrote:

...
I mean, just to clarify, these parks are closed due to the dangers caused by actual active fires in the area, not the risk of potential fires.

True. There have however been 6 fires reported in Algonquin since June 22. All are now out and they were all relatively small with reported sizes of under a hectare. 

Forest Fire Info Map

The closest active fire is just east of Mattawa, outside the north-east corner of the park. It is reported to be under control at 1.7 ha size.

The Temagami area is definitely getting harder hit at the moment. Quebec is getting hit pretty hard too.

 

     Thread Starter
 

7/11/2018 10:14 am  #28


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

I like to check the waters edge at night with head lamps ... lots of nighttime creatures out. 

My kids are still a little young to stay up really late and see the milky way ... but that would be great

 

7/11/2018 10:59 am  #29


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

There are also the little "candle lanterns" that would provide an extra level of safety over a simple candle...if they are knocked over the lantern portion would likely help prevent an immediate ignition.  See link below.

We love the stargazing in Algonquin - so much so that I now schedule trips outside of full moon dates so as not to interfere with the viewing of the milky way, satellites and meteors.  Laying on a beach or shield rock for an hour after dark typically reveals a half dozen to a dozen sightings of the above heavenly objects.

I'd opt for a candle and the iPad fire app myself...and would get to bed early so as to enjoy the sunrise.  Being a lifelong fisherman and hunter, I've seen more than my fair share of sunrises in remote, isolated environments and can attest that they are far superior in the all-around sensation that you are experiencing something that many others miss.  But I would sorely miss my campfire for cooking and ambiance. 

https://www.cabelas.com/product/Cabelas-Candle-Lantern/1233229.uts?productVariantId=1623375&WT.tsrc=PPC&WT.mc_id=GoogleProductAds&WT.z_mc_id1=54210000&rid=20&ds_rl=1252079&gclid=CjwKCAjw1ZbaBRBUEiwA4VQCIcct72D9YCuWnFcqzq0v_ERQSSjpIUg9ZKeFMUONVofuu83p-WXkRhoCSA8QAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds 

 

7/11/2018 12:39 pm  #30


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

PaPaddler wrote:

There are also the little "candle lanterns" that would provide an extra level of safety over a simple candle...if they are knocked over the lantern portion would likely help prevent an immediate ignition.  See link below.

We love the stargazing in Algonquin - so much so that I know schedule trips outside of full moon dates so as not to interfere with the viewing of the milky way, satellites and meteors.  Laying on a beach or shield rock for an hour after dark typically reveals a half dozen to a dozen sightings of the above heavenly objects.

I'd opt for a candle and the iPad fire app myself...and would get to bed early so as to enjoy the sunrise.  Being a lifelong fisherman and hunter, I've seen more than my fair share of sunrises in remote, isolated environments and can attest that they are far superior in the all-around sensation that you are experiencing something that many others miss.  But I would sorely miss my campfire for cooking and ambiance. 

https://www.cabelas.com/product/Cabelas-Candle-Lantern/1233229.uts?productVariantId=1623375&WT.tsrc=PPC&WT.mc_id=GoogleProductAds&WT.z_mc_id1=54210000&rid=20&ds_rl=1252079&gclid=CjwKCAjw1ZbaBRBUEiwA4VQCIcct72D9YCuWnFcqzq0v_ERQSSjpIUg9ZKeFMUONVofuu83p-WXkRhoCSA8QAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds 

We sell something similar at Algonquin Basecamp if anyone is going into Access 2, 3 or 4.
 

 

7/11/2018 6:35 pm  #31


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

Steve E wrote:

If you can't have an evening fire what about heading out for a night-time paddle.  That's always an enjoyable activity as I find the sounds of the Park get amplified as everything is so still and quiet. 

Great idea Steve - I’ll be doing this with my cousins provided there’s a calm enough night. As far as I know neither of them have ever even sat in a canoe, so I won’t take them out in midnight chop!

 

7/11/2018 8:59 pm  #32


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

Going in Monday the 23rd and we are planning on a full fire ban.  This is not the first time I have gone in this time of year and had fire ban.  We use 2 Candle Lanterns in the fire pit.  given the darkness, the effect is impressive.  (Incidentally, I bought mine at Algonquin Base Camp...)

I will be perusing the camp cooking threads to find good stove recipes...

 

7/11/2018 9:25 pm  #33


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

For everyone talking about sunrise > sunset, you guys are all crazy.... you need to watch both

I try and find campsites that have both east and west exposure (small islands or peninsulas are usually the best), but even if I don't get both views, I'll paddle out to watch. I can't remember the last time I actually slept through a sunrise though, it's basically tradition to wake up for it at this point.


PaPaddler wrote:

We love the stargazing in Algonquin - so much so that I know schedule trips outside of full moon dates so as not to interfere with the viewing of the milky way, satellites and meteors.  Laying on a beach or shield rock for an hour after dark typically reveals a half dozen to a dozen sightings of the above heavenly objects.

If you don't already do this, you should check moonrise timing as well. A full moon is only a problem if it's up in the sky between sunset and the time you want to sleep... but often the full moon can rise later than that. My ideal scenario is full moon rising at 10pm or so... watch the sunset, stargaze, maybe get lucky with a pretty moonrise, then call it a night. Moon rise times shift by about 45min each day, so it's a lot more variable than sunsets and sunrises
 

 

7/11/2018 9:26 pm  #34


Re: Total Fire Ban for Backcountry effective July 10, 2018

ATVenture wrote:

We sell something similar at Algonquin Basecamp if anyone is going into Access 2, 3 or 4.
 

Just called Chris again the other day to confirm my reservation... make sure you're there when you guys open on Thurs Aug 9!
 

 

Board footera