LNT Canada is a national non-profit organization dedicated to promoting responsible outdoor recreation through education, research and partnerships.

You are not logged in. Would you like to login or register?

12/22/2017 11:31 am  #1


Fishing Photos

Hi All! 

Let's see some of your favourite fishing photos from Algonquin Park this year! I only made it on 3 trips this year (6 nights total) and hope to make up for it next year.

http://i64.tinypic.com/3actj.jpg





http://i68.tinypic.com/2j4cxec.png
http://i65.tinypic.com/x5cwaw.png
http://i65.tinypic.com/de1hmb.png
http://i65.tinypic.com/nyuxyc.png
http://i68.tinypic.com/ohqsnp.jpg

 

12/22/2017 10:35 pm  #2


Re: Fishing Photos

nice pooch.

what's that in the tree?
 


Dave
 

12/22/2017 11:15 pm  #3


Re: Fishing Photos

Horrible photo I know but it was a pine marten at my campsite on the petawawa river. First time I had ever seen one before.

     Thread Starter
 

1/12/2018 5:44 pm  #4


Re: Fishing Photos

Beauty fish, congrats and thanks for posting them

 

1/13/2018 9:57 am  #5


Re: Fishing Photos

Nice photos, Lenny.  Where'd you get the Walter, in the river or the big lake?

 

1/14/2018 7:50 am  #6


Re: Fishing Photos

I'll play along. All photos were from the 2017 season in APP.. mostly everything was caught while solo at undisclosed (mostly all catch and release) locations. boy I cant wait to get back out there!

Crotch Lake Bass
https://i.imgur.com/DDFCFxY.jpg


Head Lake Laker
https://i.imgur.com/Q6EfRxY.jpg


Louisa
https://i.imgur.com/5tyGjsK.jpg


Louisa 
https://i.imgur.com/BLz6lyP.jpg


Louisa
https://i.imgur.com/Ir45MBc.jpg


More crotch bass
https://i.imgur.com/ybOBMAA.jpg


Crotch Pike
https://i.imgur.com/7qE8LMn.jpg


Maker' a laker'
https://i.imgur.com/KXLE8ac.jpg


Northern APP brookies (I'll never say where)
https://i.imgur.com/UAI7AqY.jpg


LAKE LOUISA BROOK TROUT
https://i.imgur.com/MaEjJXk.jpg


Northern APP brook trout 
https://i.imgur.com/ejzYiD6.jpg


Northern APP brookies
https://i.imgur.com/ZE0baAf.jpg

Last edited by ATVenture (1/14/2018 7:52 am)

 

1/18/2018 4:37 pm  #7


Re: Fishing Photos

Very nicely done!! I'm still jealous of your epic fishing on Louisa. Can't beat catching lakers right from the campsite! That smallmouth on the canoe paddle is a monster as well.

Swift Fifteen- Walters were caught on the Petawawa. Crazy that according to the MNR's fish consumption guide there's more contaminants in a Petawawa walleye than an Ottawa River or Rideau River walleye. 

Last edited by Lenny (1/18/2018 4:37 pm)

     Thread Starter
 

1/18/2018 5:02 pm  #8


Re: Fishing Photos

Lenny wrote:

Crazy that according to the MNR's fish consumption guide there's more contaminants in a Petawawa walleye than an Ottawa River or Rideau River walleye. 

Railbed. Guaranteed.
 

 

1/20/2018 6:55 am  #9


Re: Fishing Photos

I only got into the park twice for a few nights each time.  Was not able to land a huge number of fish but I got some good quality.

http://i68.tinypic.com/efp3qe.jpg


http://i64.tinypic.com/2li7wj4.jpg


http://i67.tinypic.com/erk4ub.jpg

 

1/22/2018 10:12 am  #10


Re: Fishing Photos

Those bass are huge and that brook trout is a monster! Nicely done!

     Thread Starter
 

1/22/2018 10:14 am  #11


Re: Fishing Photos

Peek wrote:

Lenny wrote:

Crazy that according to the MNR's fish consumption guide there's more contaminants in a Petawawa walleye than an Ottawa River or Rideau River walleye. 

Railbed. Guaranteed.
 

Yep agreed. I'd like to see it cleaned up and turned into a hiking trail. 

     Thread Starter
 

1/22/2018 10:43 am  #12


Re: Fishing Photos

Lenny wrote:

Peek wrote:

Lenny wrote:

Crazy that according to the MNR's fish consumption guide there's more contaminants in a Petawawa walleye than an Ottawa River or Rideau River walleye. 

Railbed. Guaranteed.
 

Yep agreed. I'd like to see it cleaned up and turned into a hiking trail. 

Great idea but who's going to pay for the clean up of the contaminated ballast, not to mention the creosote laden ground from the pre existing ties. Once you begin a clean-up on a rail bed it never ends like the feasibility studies suggest. I haven't walked that rail bed in many years but i suspect it's the same as any other.

 

1/22/2018 12:18 pm  #13


Re: Fishing Photos

Swift Fifteen wrote:

Lenny wrote:

Peek wrote:


Railbed. Guaranteed.
 

Yep agreed. I'd like to see it cleaned up and turned into a hiking trail. 

Great idea but who's going to pay for the clean up of the contaminated ballast, not to mention the creosote laden ground from the pre existing ties. Once you begin a clean-up on a rail bed it never ends like the feasibility studies suggest. I haven't walked that rail bed in many years but i suspect it's the same as any other.

Agreed it will probably never happen in my lifetime and may never happen. I don't think it's unfeasible remove the creosote and cap the railway with asphalt and cap the side slopes with geotextile and add topsoil and a native seed mixture. I've seen it happen before but on a much smaller scale.
 

     Thread Starter
 

1/22/2018 2:25 pm  #14


Re: Fishing Photos

Lenny wrote:

Swift Fifteen wrote:

Lenny wrote:


Yep agreed. I'd like to see it cleaned up and turned into a hiking trail. 

Great idea but who's going to pay for the clean up of the contaminated ballast, not to mention the creosote laden ground from the pre existing ties. Once you begin a clean-up on a rail bed it never ends like the feasibility studies suggest. I haven't walked that rail bed in many years but i suspect it's the same as any other.

Agreed it will probably never happen in my lifetime and may never happen. I don't think it's unfeasible remove the creosote and cap the railway with asphalt and cap the side slopes with geotextile and add topsoil and a native seed mixture. I've seen it happen before but on a much smaller scale.
 

I was only referring to removing the contaminants, which is highly unlikley. To turn it into a green space like youre suggesting is in fact unfeasible $$$ and better left for dreamers and leprechauns..lol.  But i certainly applaud your optimism.

Btw, i completely agree with Peek regarding the rail bed and walleye connection due to leeching contaminants from creosote and other contaminates left behind form wooden ties, rail cars, and maintenance crews. That creosote is a nasty substance filled with carcinogens, amongst other harmful contaminants.
 

 

1/22/2018 8:51 pm  #15


Re: Fishing Photos

Surprising, if I read the chart right, most of the contamination in Algonquin is Mercury and PCBs.  Possibly left over from pulp processing?  I was expecting Louisa to be contaminated with arsenic.  It was Mercury and PCBs at Louisa. If you go to the MNR site,  they have a map with clickable fish telling you why fish are not edible in each area or the limit you should eat. There are several lakes within Algonquin, every one I checked had the Mercury code. Some had the pcb code. Maybe from coal plants burning farther south?  I am guessing. I am completely uneducated on pollution travel and movement.

 

1/23/2018 11:41 pm  #16


Re: Fishing Photos

Mercury is the contaminant in almost every 'Guide to eating Ontario sport fish' listing there is. As I understand it this is due to both natural occurrences, as well as weather impacts (ie, coal plants, industry emissions). Local source is less common. Whether they choose to look for other contaminants in a sample is based on the location- if they feel running further tests is warranted, they will. So all that to say, we don't know if they consider the rail bed a contamination risk, and if they tested for anything other than mercury. It can be quite a puzzle when you start digging into the guide, often with surprising results.

 

1/24/2018 8:07 am  #17


Re: Fishing Photos

"There are several lakes within Algonquin, every one I checked had the Mercury code."

A reason why there are possibly toxic mercury levels in APP fishes is the low pH of the lakes... the lower the pH, the greater the mercury uptake in the food chain. Lakes in limestone bedrock won't be affected much since the calcium-bearing limestone buffers the water and limits acidification, keeping pH higher. Most APP lakes are typical shield lakes without much calcium buffering capacity so pH can be low resulting in acid lakes.

The bigger-picture trend isn't good as you might have gathered from the news reports recently... decalcification of shield lake watersheds from acid rain is reducing buffering capacity and logging further decalcifies watersheds by removing calcium-bearing wood biomass where in the natural condition, the trees would fall and decay into the ground, returning calcium to the watershed and waterbodies

Resolving the effects of the rail bed from the bigger-picture decalcification isn't something I'd want to make a decision on in government... IIRC, both government and CNR have stated that they don't own that land and so aren't responsible for cleaning it up. One way to decide if rail bed remediation money would be spent wisely is to judge whether the rail bed remediation would actually result in any measurable improvement in toxin levels relative to the ongoing, bigger-picture decalcification and acidification trend. Not easy to do, probably, and needs money, which most likely isn't available at the moment.

 

Board footera