LNT Canada is a national non-profit organization dedicated to promoting responsible outdoor recreation through education, research and partnerships.

You are not logged in. Would you like to login or register?

6/05/2017 8:31 pm  #1


Newb questions

Hi All. A few questions for those that fish the lakes of Algonquin.

First me, The last time I caught something was a 45lb Chinook back in 85 the summer before I needed to start buying fishing licences. My parents were huge into salmon fishing. I still hate salmon, yucky lol. Did you know if 4 people limit out you can put more fish in a freezer than moose meat? I got a line wet last year on the Grand but didn't get any interest. This year I qualify as an Ont. resident so I'll buy my 3rd licence in my lifetime. Second Ont one.

I have no great desire to C/R for fun. My intention is to try and catch dinner so I'll only be releasing illegals. Due to my Dad getting my oldest hooked on Rainbows I'm adapt at C/R with them, I assume the rest are the same. 

My question, What makes a decent eating fish? I'll mostly be on Linda, but Bruce is apparently stocked with splake so I may portage back if the hive mind thinks it's worth it. (I hope naming lakes in this context is ok???) 
Cooking will be tinfoil over a fire.
Bigger question for this idiot lol. What do I put on the string to target the prefered food fish? I have no trouble targeting non trout if it's going to taste ok. 
Method will be from my kayak mostly with maybe a few tries from shore if I can't seem to get fishing from the boat figured out.

Any non obvious Algonquin rules I should know? Compared to BC your regs are a pain in the bum to understand, and I often had trouble with them if I got talked into taking my daughter without Grandpa. I much prefered to drive the boat and go over the side with a full tank of air while they tried to tease fish into the boat.

Last but not least, any absolute Do Not's?


Pat.
Sea Kayaker stuck in the middle of the country too far from the ocean.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons. For thou art crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
 

6/05/2017 11:42 pm  #2


Re: Newb questions

Splake are a fantastic option. Very tasty, large, and totally guilt free! If you want to do a real favour to Algonquin, head over to Booth and fry up some pike- delicious! Or wait till bass season is open on Linda and target them (end of June).

Until the mnr has the sense to open bass season with trout in Algonquin, you're stuck with trout on Linda this time of year. You'll be happy with either variety, and I completely support the practice of keeping the first fish you catch for dinner, and relieving the population of any further pressure. If you're going to be eating fish, this is the way to do it.

No live baitfish in Algonquin!

 

6/06/2017 6:31 am  #3


Re: Newb questions

Actually, some of the best eating (in my opinion) are the easiest to catch - panfish and perch.  A worm on a hook with a bobber near a downed tree or ledge by the shoreline will often get you one.  You'll need to catch a half-dozen or so to make a meal but their meat is white and flaky with a very mild flavor...similar to flounder but just much smaller.  I wouldn't keep any smaller than four or five inches - not much meat on those dainty little ones.

 

6/06/2017 7:23 am  #4


Re: Newb questions

When is your trip? That will determine what's in season and therefore what you have to worry about. The main rule that's specific to Algonquin is no live baitfish, not that you'd be hauling in a bucket of live minnows over the portages most likely anyway. If you don't like salmon you may not like trout either... on the other hand you may find that a 1 to 3 lb invert-fed Algonquin trout tastes much better than a big, greasy 35 lb chinook. Laker, brookie or splake, they do go deep as the weather warms so have a plan for fishing deep (eg bottom bouncers, or leadcore line on a trolling setup).

I agree with PaPaddler that perch are a good choice if you prefer white-fleshed fish, but I'm not sure if the lakes you're going to have them, and if they do, whether they have them in good eating sizes. Some perch communities consist solely of stunted individuals who could barely take a hook, and not produce much of a meal.

 

6/06/2017 7:54 am  #5


Re: Newb questions

There are some decent sized perch on ragged.  Ive caught a few 8-9 inchers.
Like has already been said, find a downed tree in the water near shore and logs and such. 
And yes I agree with nvm, fry up as many pike as legally allowed.

 

6/06/2017 5:55 pm  #6


Re: Newb questions

I enjoy rainbow, just prefered buying them to waiting for them lol. And the summers of 3-4 salmon meals a week is a distant memory. First world problem I know and here in the middle of the country I probably sound like a spoiled brat but back in the early 80's catching them was the easy part. If you were only getting 2 or 3 a hour change up your gear because the fish aren't biting. Now I'm told you'll go a few hours between bites

Supposed to be leaving thursday at 5... but I have too much to do. Dentist today has me on the pooter instead of wiring trailer lights and packing gear.

So I guess a question I should ask, what fish CAN'T I keep this weekend? I'll google and print pics to take with me. 


Pat.
Sea Kayaker stuck in the middle of the country too far from the ocean.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons. For thou art crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
     Thread Starter
 

6/06/2017 7:06 pm  #7


Re: Newb questions

Lazerus wrote:

So I guess a question I should ask, what fish CAN'T I keep this weekend? I'll google and print pics to take with me. 

You can keep everything but bass.
http://i66.tinypic.com/ndmqfs.png

 

 

6/06/2017 11:07 pm  #8


Re: Newb questions

Indeed, always consult the regs, not the forums for that info. Certain lakes in Algonquin have additional regulations- check the book/online.

Apparently burbot are pretty tasty, if you can catch one. Most lakes have them. I tried fishing for bullhead at ice out and had no luck.

And 3-4 salmon meals a week from the Great Lakes! Even, or perhaps especially, in the 80s that seems like overexposure. Ever checked the guide to eating sport fish for Lake Ontario salmon? At your own risk, I'd say.

Last edited by nvm (6/06/2017 11:08 pm)

 

6/06/2017 11:36 pm  #9


Re: Newb questions

nvm wrote:

Indeed, always consult the regs, not the forums for that info. Certain lakes in Algonquin have additional regulations- check the book/online.

As I said in my original, I have a hell of a time understanding the regs, tho, I must say that table made way more sense... Maybe because someone that knew what they were looking for looked for it.


nvm wrote:

And 3-4 salmon meals a week from the Great Lakes! Even, or perhaps especially, in the 80s that seems like overexposure. Ever checked the guide to eating sport fish for Lake Ontario salmon? At your own risk, I'd say.

Sorry I should have been more clear. Not that nasty Atlantic salmon, Pacific salmon, caught in the Fraser river and off the coast of BC. I'm a recent transplant, arrived May 15 last year. Tho technically I arrived in Ontario on the 13th. Took me 2 days to get from just across the boarder to Cambridge. 


Pat.
Sea Kayaker stuck in the middle of the country too far from the ocean.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons. For thou art crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
     Thread Starter
 

6/06/2017 11:55 pm  #10


Re: Newb questions

Ah, that's probably a good thing. I imagine the ocean going salmon are a somewhat less contaminated. But we've got those pacific salmon here in the Great Lakes too. In fact, atlantics are a recent reintroduction to Ontario- pacifics have been ruling the roost here.

 

6/07/2017 7:41 am  #11


Re: Newb questions

Lazerus wrote:

As I said in my original, I have a hell of a time understanding the regs, tho, I must say that table made way more sense... Maybe because someone that knew what they were looking for looked for it.

Lazerus, the table is straight from the official regs summary. That's how it's presented.

Don't be intimidated by the regs... once you get the hang of reading them it's fairly straightforward. Ontario's regs are in once sense complicated since there are so many different zones and waterbodies with different rules, but in another sense quite simple, since there are no different licensing requirements for different species/areas or annual tags like exist in some provinces.

So here's my little guide to using the Ontario regs summary:

STEP 1. If you are unclear about Ontario's overall fishing rules that govern tackle, bait, fish transport, etc, refer to the "General Fishing Regulations" at the start of the booklet. Page 7 in the current edition. If you already know your simple rod and lure setup is legal, skip this step.

STEP 2. Flip to the page for the Fisheries Management Zone you're fishing in. If you don't know the FMZ, look at the rough map on page 3 and then confirm with the more detailed map on the FMZ page itself. On the FMZ page you'll see a table just like RCShevalier posted. That tells you the seasons, catch limits, and size restrictions where applicable for each species for that zone.

STEP 3. Under the table you'll see "Additional Zone X Fishing Opportunities", and it will have little boxes with a more liberal season for some species (eg "Brook trout open all year") and an alphabetical list of waters in which it applies. For purposes of Algonquin you can skip this step; you won't find anything relevant. This comes into play mostly when fishing Great Lakes tributaries for migratory salmonids, or when fishing stocked lakes in some areas, but not Algonquin Park.

STEP 4. Under that is the "exceptions" -- waterbodies in which the rule for one or more species differs from the zone-wide or province-wide rules. This could mean different limits, shorter seasons, non-standard size restrictions, or gear/tackle/bait restrictions. They are listed alphabetically by waterbody, or in some cases region... like in the case of Algonquin Park there are park-wide exceptions that you'll find listed under Algonquin (winter closure, no live baitfish).

There's also a little shortcut to finding out seasons and limits:
- go to Fish ON-Line 
- find your lake through the Search By > Waterbody Name function, or by zooming to it on the map
- once you've clicked on the correct lake, and see the little info box pop up on the left, click on the Regulations tab
- you'll see expandable buttons for "Zone Wide Seasons & Limits" and "Exceptions to Zone Regulations"

Of course this only works if your lake is included in their database.

 

Board footera