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5/07/2017 3:07 pm  #18


Re: How to transport eggs

take a drive in the country. There are plenty of places with a sign out front...eggs for sale. It won't be a production farm because they could lose their licence selling eggs that way but even if they are washed they will be very fresh. Farmers markets are great too.

 

5/08/2017 6:04 am  #19


Re: How to transport eggs

tentsterforever wrote:

From a farmer: scoutergriz is absolutely right. The shell protects against bacteria.
Unwashed eggs are best to take,however, farmers can NOT sell eggs to private people.
So knocking on a farmers door is not going to work for you.THe chicken board is very strict about that here in Canada.
I am uncertain if Mennonite families have an exemption from that.

It was my understanding that anyone could sell ungraded eggs directly from the farm, and the regs don't appear to disagree. But at least small independent farms can, and do, sell directly. A great source of eggs, camping or otherwise!


http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/food/inspection/eggs/eggregsummary.htm

"Requirements under Regulation 171/10
The new regulation includes the following requirements:

A general prohibition from selling ungraded eggs, with an exemption for producers who sell directly to consumers on the farm."

 

5/08/2017 9:09 am  #20


Re: How to transport eggs

This exemption is for farmers with less then 300 birds, which are hard to find in the area where I live. Most farms around me are commercial farms and they will not sell eggs at the door. However, i would be cautious  buying eggs from a source with a small flock, as there is no way of  knowing how they were stored and for how long.
I say that because we have a few chickens of our own, and the eggs we cannot consume we throw out , I wouldn't  want anyone to get a bad egg from me .

 

5/08/2017 9:41 am  #21


Re: How to transport eggs

Brought 12 eggs in one of those egg transporters and happy to say no yolk leaked at all! Although a few were mildly cracked. I really wasn't gentle and mostly forgot about them. Unfortunately, they remained uneaten since we turned back on Saturday fearing the cold as we were all still fairly wet. 

     Thread Starter
 

5/09/2017 8:18 am  #22


Re: How to transport eggs

tentsterforever wrote:

This exemption is for farmers with less then 300 birds, which are hard to find in the area where I live. Most farms around me are commercial farms and they will not sell eggs at the door. However, i would be cautious  buying eggs from a source with a small flock, as there is no way of  knowing how they were stored and for how long.
I say that because we have a few chickens of our own, and the eggs we cannot consume we throw out , I wouldn't  want anyone to get a bad egg from me .

In reading through the linked document, I couldn't find anything that says a farmer has to be operating outside of the quota system (which is under 100 hens) to sell at farm gate. However, I'm sure very few commercial egg farmers sell at farm gate; they just sell directly to processors because it's what they're set up for.

The reason for the grading exemption for farm gate sales is so that the customer can actually observe the premises, and would be able to ask to see the chickens, before deciding if they want to buy eggs there.

Eggs don't need to be refrigerated- it's only North Americans who do that due to processing style.
If an egg goes bad- you'll know it! You wouldn't get the opportunity to eat it, if you cracked it and smelled it. If an egg has salmonella on it- you'd never know it! Commercial or otherwise. That's why it is recommended that we cook eggs before consuming, and why it would be tempting fate to crack a bunch of eggs into a container and leave them out of the fridge for a few days.

 

5/11/2017 2:21 pm  #23


Re: How to transport eggs

I just bought some Whole Egg Powder from Hoosier Hill Farms (you can get it on Amazon). Haven't tried it yet but I'm told that it's nearly indistinguishable when scrambled and the ingredient list is simply: eggs.

We pack our food in a dry sack (not a barrel) and it gets shoved into a hiking style backpack. Even if we did use a crush proof container, we wouldn't have the space for it without buying a bigger pack. 

Also, my primary purpose will be for baking in my new reflector oven so the dried version works well for us.

 

5/11/2017 2:33 pm  #24


Re: How to transport eggs

which reflector oven did you buy?

 

5/12/2017 8:58 am  #25


Re: How to transport eggs

@jdbonney - we got the one available at Canadian Outdoor Equipment Co. 

https://www.canadianoutdoorequipment.com/reflector-oven-by-svante-freden.html

I liked that I could order online and it has a simple, no fuss design. I'll have an opportunity to break it in and try it out the May long weekend. 

 

5/25/2017 1:22 pm  #26


Re: How to transport eggs

did you try the hoosier hill egg powder yet? Is it any good?

 

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