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5/03/2017 12:57 pm  #1


How to transport eggs

How do you guys do it without the eggs breaking?

 

5/03/2017 1:05 pm  #2


Re: How to transport eggs

I usually just use the yellow clam-shell style carton. I have many times in the past, cracked my eggs into a nalgene for transport. As long as you don't leave room, they cushion each other and stay together pretty well. I would be careful with food handling if you choose the latter.

 

5/03/2017 3:31 pm  #3


Re: How to transport eggs

If we are using them on the first morning waking up in the park, I pre crack them into cleaned out plastic peanut butter containers.  We always bring a good cooler so they keep nicely.  Makes making the breakfast burritos that much easier!

 

5/03/2017 3:48 pm  #4


Re: How to transport eggs

The Kevin Callan. Tape them under your canoe seat in the cardboard container you bought them in.  They'll keep for a week if bought at grocery store. 2 weeks if they are farm fresh and unwashed. 

 

5/03/2017 3:59 pm  #5


Re: How to transport eggs

Yellow plastic egg holders work fine and keep them fresh for at least 7-10 days. Pre-cracked eggs will get spoiled much faster than the whole ones. I'm sure constant whipping on portages doesn't help.

 

5/03/2017 7:29 pm  #6


Re: How to transport eggs

I use the yellow clamshell thing.  I only use medium eggs with it as large or x-large are too big and will break when you close it up.  I put a tight elastic around it, then put it in a PC x-large ziplock bag.  Usually I get no breaks, and for sure the thing won't fly open with the elastic (I have had that happen before - disaster) but if it does, the ziplock catches the mess.

 

5/03/2017 8:30 pm  #7


Re: How to transport eggs

i use the old yellow plastic clam shell too. works great, bacon and tater tots for breakie anyone?
 i am not sure were i read this (possibly "ralph bice`s" book " along the trail in algonquin park")
    trippers were herding along the portage several live chickens for fresh eggs and chicken dinners,, they also had a small pig with them for fresh pork. those were da days eh!!!

 

5/03/2017 8:56 pm  #8


Re: How to transport eggs

That's classic Swede , enjoy hearing stories before dehydrated food .
Not egg related , a few years back , had a real good chat with a lad in his 90's , they would head into Weasel lake in the spring with a bag of potatoes ...... eat half the bag and plant the rest . They would return in the fall and harvest fresh potatoes , to be cooked with fresh squaretails .
When I bring eggs along in spring , I wrap them in newspaper and stuff them in a bushsock .

 

5/04/2017 7:31 am  #9


Re: How to transport eggs

Unwashed, non-refrigerated eggs will keep for a few weeks.  It's what is commonly done in Europe (strange to see the eggs on a shelf next to cereal with no refrigeration, but look it up, it works) so find a local farm and ask them to set aside a dozen or two then use one of the protection methods above for transporting them un-damaged.

 

5/04/2017 8:41 am  #10


Re: How to transport eggs

Yellow clamshell container, with a layer of paper towel between the eggs and the lid.  We use a blue barrel, so the container is placed "in the middle", with stuff underneath and around the sides.  A soft cooler with other stuff is placed on top.  The container doesn't move around, no matter what happens to the barrel.  (Don't ask, eh?)

Barbara


Take everything as it comes; the wave passes, deal with the next one.

Tom Thomson, 1877-1917
 

5/04/2017 8:50 am  #11


Re: How to transport eggs

I forgot the "worst case scenario step":

Put the container inside a large ziplock bag.  Fits perfectly.


Barbara

Last edited by Barbara (5/04/2017 8:50 am)


Take everything as it comes; the wave passes, deal with the next one.

Tom Thomson, 1877-1917
 

5/04/2017 9:21 am  #12


Re: How to transport eggs

Break the eggs and put them into a wide mouth nalgene container. A 250ml container holds 6 large eggs...

Moonman.

 

5/05/2017 9:58 pm  #13


Re: How to transport eggs

I've used the yellow clamshell thing before but found that breakage was too common a problem. These day I usually keep them in their cardboard container & wrap it in a few layers of newspaper. Store flyers work well.

When backpacking I will often use a Pringles tin - balled-up paper towel, egg, paper towel, egg, paper towel egg...you get the idea. I've had great success with both method. Only one broken egg that I recall. 


Dave
 

5/06/2017 9:53 am  #14


Re: How to transport eggs

"Break the eggs and put them into a wide mouth nalgene container" Please don't do this! The shell protects the egg from bacteria, as soon as you break the egg you let oxygen in, which allows bacteria to grow. Salmonella is odourless and tasteless, and begins to proliferate within a couple of hours. The CDC recommends no more than 2-4 hours for REFERIDGERATED eggs.

 

5/06/2017 10:00 pm  #15


Re: How to transport eggs

Algonquintripper...one layer of paper towel between the eggs and the lid of the container will solve any breakage problem.

We had a breakage problem years ago, when the small cooler fell to the ground.  Can't remember why, but the eggs in the yellow container were smashed.  That's when I learned to put that cushion of a layer of paper towel in there.  No problems since then, and the barrel we use has had some "adventures".  Eggs stayed safe and sound.

I've not trusted the cardboard that eggs come in for a long time.  I check each egg before buying the package, and I have rejected up to 4 cartons because of broken eggs.  I really wouldn't trust them to be transported in the flimsy cardboard containers.


Barbara


Take everything as it comes; the wave passes, deal with the next one.

Tom Thomson, 1877-1917
 

5/06/2017 11:44 pm  #16


Re: How to transport eggs

scoutergriz wrote:

"Break the eggs and put them into a wide mouth nalgene container" Please don't do this! The shell protects the egg from bacteria, as soon as you break the egg you let oxygen in, which allows bacteria to grow. Salmonella is odourless and tasteless, and begins to proliferate within a couple of hours. The CDC recommends no more than 2-4 hours for REFERIDGERATED eggs.

Absolutely. No reason not to transport whole in the shell, unbroken.

 

5/07/2017 1:42 pm  #17


Re: How to transport eggs

From a farmer: scoutergriz is absolutely right. The shell protects against bacteria.
Unwashed eggs are best to take,however, farmers can NOT sell eggs to private people.
So knocking on a farmers door is not going to work for you.THe chicken board is very strict about that here in Canada.
I am uncertain if Mennonite families have an exemption from that.
There is an easy way to check if store bought eggs are still good to eat. Take one of your pots, a tall one is recommended, fill half full with water and put egg in with point to the bottom. If egg stays on the bottom, egg is good ( air chamber inside is small) if egg starts to come up a bit, but does not yet float,egg is older but okay( air chamber is enlarging). If egg floats, throw out, do not eat, egg has started to decompose (and airchamber is large)

 

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