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4/10/2017 12:33 pm  #1


Neoprene Socks

Hey everyone,

I'm thinking about added Neoprene socks to my gear collection.  I typically enjoy wandering around campsites and sitting in the canoe in barefeet but I was thinking for the portage trail neoprene socks may be a good add to the collection.

I've seen some on Amazon and of course some at stores like sail (wonder if Costco has em?). 


Truth is no body I know has used them and I much prefer forum members opinions/reviews then the general Internet.


If some of you could be so kind to let me know which brands you've tried, where you bought them from, what you like/dislike about them and a rough cost I would greatly appreciate it.


Thanks in advance Chris!

 

4/10/2017 10:15 pm  #2


Re: Neoprene Socks

I have these in the high and low. The low have a cinch cord too keep out debris. Footwear of choice in the shoulder seasons. Keane make a nice water shoe also but they are pricey.

https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5021-651/Moque-Boots-High

 

4/11/2017 6:38 am  #3


Re: Neoprene Socks

I have been using a low pair of these for years, I am only able to get up to the park once a year and choose the early May time frame.  They are great at helping to keep my feet warm.  i regularly step into water above the top of them but my pair is fairly tight and as long as I don't linger my feet stay relativly dry (I think I sweat more than I get "wet").  I got mine at Cabellas (their brand).  One pair has lasted me thus far, 6 trips and are just starting to show the wear.

 

4/11/2017 7:36 am  #4


Re: Neoprene Socks

I have honestly never heard of neoprene socks, but I am curious because I always have issue with my feet being cold/wet.
So are they basically a thin, light, waterproof sock?

 

4/11/2017 8:34 am  #5


Re: Neoprene Socks

Thin - I wouldn't call them thin - they are basically the foot of a the neoprene wader.  Here is a link to the Cabela brand sock I have:

http://www.cabelas.com/product/Cabelas-Mens-mm-Neoprene-Wading-Socks-with-Built-In-Gaiters/732882.uts?searchPath=%2Fbrowse.cmd%3FcategoryId%3D734095080%26CQ_search%3Dneoprene%2Bsocks


 

 

4/11/2017 9:48 am  #6


Re: Neoprene Socks

I have used a pair of Neoprene socks for years.  Mine cost me $50 for a pair.

They will definitely keep you feet warm and dry while even standing in water.  Anyways, mine do.

Last edited by boknows (4/11/2017 9:49 am)


Tripping in Algonquin Park is not about seeking shelter from a storm, tripping in Algonquin Park is about dancing in the rain!
 

4/11/2017 10:40 am  #7


Re: Neoprene Socks

I have the MEC high moque neoprene boot as well although I thought I would like something higher for the colder months so I'm trying out the NRS Boundary boot this year. ( also Neoprene)

http://www.yakangler.com/media/reviews/photos/thumbnail/315x315s/db/9f/a2/nrs-boundary-shoe-75-1378395814.jpg

Last edited by ShawnD (4/11/2017 10:45 am)

 

4/11/2017 12:11 pm  #8


Re: Neoprene Socks

Hi Chris,

I've used neoprene socks as a part of my summer camping footwear system for three years now. Here's what I do:

1. Teva sandals
2. Neoprene socks from MEC (2 sizes larger than your shoe size)
3. Thin merino socks (3 pairs)

Here's what I do:
1) Paddling and short portages: Sandals only. They breathe well, comfortable and obviously don't have to worry about them getting wet. Great grip on wet rocks too. 
2) Long portages: I put on a pair of socks, it's more comfortable and avoids blisters
3) Camp at the end of the day: socks with neoprene booties. 

Advantages: 
1) Very light
2) Totally waterproof
3) Dry feet at the end of the day (dry socks inside the neoprene sock)
4) Cost: $15 for neoprene booties. $20/pair of good merino socks. $100 for the Tevas. 

The key is that the neoprene booties shouldn't be super tight, so 2-3 sizes larger than your usual. 

https://www.mec.ca/en/product/4013-787/Neoprene-Socks-II

M
 

Last edited by Marko_Mrko (4/11/2017 12:14 pm)

 

4/11/2017 1:06 pm  #9


Re: Neoprene Socks

Wow thanks for all the replies everyone!  Lots of info to take in. 

I think i willl pick up a pair for sure very soon.  It seems like everyone is happy with them.  I will also check out the links some of you have posted.

     Thread Starter
 

4/11/2017 3:13 pm  #10


Re: Neoprene Socks

Marko_Mrko wrote:

Hi Chris,

I've used neoprene socks as a part of my summer camping footwear system for three years now. Here's what I do:

1. Teva sandals
2. Neoprene socks from MEC (2 sizes larger than your shoe size)
3. Thin merino socks (3 pairs)

Here's what I do:
1) Paddling and short portages: Sandals only. They breathe well, comfortable and obviously don't have to worry about them getting wet. Great grip on wet rocks too. 
2) Long portages: I put on a pair of socks, it's more comfortable and avoids blisters
3) Camp at the end of the day: socks with neoprene booties. 

Advantages: 
1) Very light
2) Totally waterproof
3) Dry feet at the end of the day (dry socks inside the neoprene sock)
4) Cost: $15 for neoprene booties. $20/pair of good merino socks. $100 for the Tevas. 

The key is that the neoprene booties shouldn't be super tight, so 2-3 sizes larger than your usual. 

https://www.mec.ca/en/product/4013-787/Neoprene-Socks-II

M
 

So you wear the neoprene socks on their own around camp correct (not inside of your sandals or a boot?)

Last edited by ATVenture (4/11/2017 3:14 pm)

 

4/11/2017 11:30 pm  #11


Re: Neoprene Socks

Ya, I wear the neoprene booties on top of the merino socks. No sandal around camp, they are usually drying somewhere. Feet stay dry, it's luxurious. 

Also, when starting a long portage I put the socks on even if the sandals are damp. The socks really don't get wet as the sandal does not hold much water. 

Rainy days, usually the neoprene bootie with a sock and the sandal. My feet don't sweat much with this, it's usually cooler when raining. But a possible issue for some. 

M
 

 

4/12/2017 6:58 am  #12


Re: Neoprene Socks

Marko_Mrko wrote:

Ya, I wear the neoprene booties on top of the merino socks. No sandal around camp, they are usually drying somewhere. Feet stay dry, it's luxurious. 

Also, when starting a long portage I put the socks on even if the sandals are damp. The socks really don't get wet as the sandal does not hold much water. 

Rainy days, usually the neoprene bootie with a sock and the sandal. My feet don't sweat much with this, it's usually cooler when raining. But a possible issue for some. 

M
 

So the neoprene sock are durable enough to hold up to stepping on sticks, rocks, etc..? They do indeed seem like a good item to have, I might have to order a pair!

 

4/12/2017 3:27 pm  #13


Re: Neoprene Socks

I wouldn't hike in them, but they are fine around camp.
M

 

4/15/2017 10:36 am  #14


Re: Neoprene Socks

I was looking at some neoprene socks today.
They didnt seem to be waterproof.
Do those who do the neoprene sock thing wear them barefoot and then just wear a normal hiking shoe or boot?

I was looking at the soled booty type designs that ShawnD had posted and I am comtemplating those as they're not much more expensive than socks.
I wasn't sure how they would be on portages with a pack and canoe though as they dont seem to have much support...

 

4/16/2017 6:59 am  #15


Re: Neoprene Socks

Neoprene is not waterproof. Neoprene socks like the ones at MEC won't keep your feet dry if you are standing in water. They are water resistant and they provide insulation. The perspiration or sweating some people report could be the water getting through. Neoprene in a wetsuit or sock is designed to trap a thin layer of moisture against your skin where your body heat warms it up and the neoprene provides insulation.

I used to wear Neoprene socks with old sneakers to keep my feet warm. That works. I currently use NRS work boots. A store bought solution that wraps a 5mm neoprene sock in a burly high cut boot.

I could see how Neoprene socks would make for a lightweight camp shoe. That's a clever idea.

The worst thing about neoprene socks is the ungodly smell!

 

4/16/2017 11:37 am  #16


Re: Neoprene Socks

I'll be the naysayer on the forum.
i bought a pair when i was learning to sail dinghies. Similar to the low model MEC, with a rubber sole. I found that after they got wet, they kept your feet warmer than they would in just running shoes or sandals, but the wetness was an issue. Wrinkly feet, and the boots are never perfectly dry for the rest of the day after once being submerged.. I don't know how Marko can wear them in camp.
Also, in my case, I found that although my feet were warmer at first, if the weather warmed up, my feet would be warmer without the booties than with, especially if i could get some sun on my feet. If i kept them on for too long my Raynaud's syndrome would kick in. I may be a special case due to the Raynauds, so take my criticism with a grain of salt. 
My response has been to avoid early season canoeing. :-)

Last edited by Methye (4/16/2017 11:39 am)

 

4/16/2017 1:07 pm  #17


Re: Neoprene Socks

In my book neoprene socks are strictly for cold weather canoeing (say water below 40-45) when you know you might get your feet wet: then neoprene will keep them wet, but warm. In all other conditions neoprene is not breathable enough, not waterproof and provides next to none protection from roots and rocks. It also won't dry on its own and will keep your feet wet forever.

 

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