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Trip Planning » Ice Out Trip Recommendations » 1/08/2018 6:11 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 10

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Up/down the Nip and Tim Rivers would give reliable fishing opportunities virtually along their entire length.  The bigger the rivers and the rapids get, the bigger the specs might be.  Spring flows take most of the beaver dams out of the equation as well, although they are only minor annoyances in lower levels.  If fishing is driving the decision as a primary factor, I'd do the rivers.  Plus, the lakes you hit will give a nice change of scenery.

The only drawback is those rivers are long and tortuous...to the point of getting monotonous.  If you love working the pry and draw strokes, it will be a dream.  If you are easily annoyed and get bored, it will be a nightmare.

The second option isn't bad at all...I would just build a weather day into the trip in case you get delayed along the way.  Although I would build a weather day into any spring trip, so there.

Skills » Finding your way when the way can't be found(low maintenance portages) » 1/04/2018 11:46 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 12

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Hi Uppa,

I've never used a GPS so I cannot comment on that from experience but I expect they are pretty darned fool proof to know where you are and see which direction you need to go.

Flagging tape - I think it's a very reasonable approach should you find the trail vanishing under your feet.  Only recommendation would be to recover the tape when you've reached your destination or found the trail again - that way it's not littering.

Hatchet - personally, I'm a collapsible saw guy and would expect that you generally walk around or over most obstacles.  Saws are lighter and nice for firewood (only cut about a third or halfway through a piece and then break it to save energy).  I understand the utility of a hatchet but when you consider that most folks have a stove it really negates the safety element of "i need it to get into the dry heartwood to make a fire".  I've never used a hatchet in AP and have always been able to get a good fire going.  Skills beat utensils.

The handful of low maintenance portages I've been on have been much like regular maintenance ones so I cannot offer specific advice but it is a roll of the dice from one year and one portage to the next.  I know from my time in the field hunting, hiking, camping, etc. that paying attention to the topography around you is helpful.  It's more challenging in central Ontario because you don't have as "predictable" topography to guide you many times, but by looking for hills, creeks, etc. it can assist in keeping your bearings.

Where Is This? » Where in Algonquin #208 » 12/15/2017 10:29 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 21

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Agreed.  Poor word choice on my part.  The sandy bank does look like it could be part of that large spit at the lower end of Grand...but no idea where specifically it might be.

Where Is This? » Where in Algonquin #208 » 12/15/2017 7:23 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 21

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I have no idea, but I love the geologic clues.  My interest is piqued as to what feature it might be that is unique to Algonquin!?

Trip Planning » 4 Days - 3 Nights; Trip Recommendations » 12/04/2017 1:39 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 23

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Tons of options...and it's nice you guys are backpackers because it makes those canoe routes that seem more like hiking routes a viable option.

1. Crotch access 17 NE to McKaskill then NW to Dickson...two options for return from here through Annie Bay or through Round Island lake.  Portage heavy trip.
2. Opeongo Taxi routes - either Lavielle like has been mentioned (an Algonquin classic) or a variety of routes to include Big Crow, Hogan, la Muir, Red Pine Bay, Big Trout, Otterslide and/or Happy Isle based on how far you want to travel daily.  Taxi makes life easy at the beginning and end.
3. Smoke lake south - can include any number of the smaller lake loops from Big Porcupine back through Cache or be aggressive and include a paddle through Louisa.

I wouldn't worry a ton about paddling experience...more paddling takes care of that and having some paddling experience keeps you from learning the toughest lessons deep in the backcountry. 

The season you are traveling in also is a busy one so the routes that get more than a few portages between you and an access point will feel very remote.

Trip Planning » Northern Lights » 12/01/2017 5:44 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 9

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Agreed, MartinG, crossed my mind a number of times.

Trip Planning » Northern Lights » 11/28/2017 3:56 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 9

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Weather dependent - solar weather (substantial solar flare activity) and earthly weather (limited cloud cover) are two predominant factors.  You should have a good 24-48 hour lead time for better likelihood of seeing anything.

The further north you go, the better your chances; any site with open viewing to the north would suffice.

Good predictions here:
http://www.aurora-service.org/aurora-forecast/

and here:
https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/
 

Where Is This? » Where is this 200? » 11/19/2017 11:55 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 20

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Big Crow at the Crow River exit?

Where Is This? » Where in Algonquin? No.199 » 11/16/2017 3:43 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 17

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Some folks call him "Sneaky Peek"
Posting locations that we seek

North of the highway, most of the time
Until you assume, then he spins on a dime

Trip Reports » Fall trip down the Pet » 11/15/2017 6:29 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 9

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Don't know how I missed this post back in September but that is great!  What a treat to run into Bob and Diana!  Almost like royalty!

Trip Planning » Late Srping trip options with young kids » 11/15/2017 6:21 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 11

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I'd do Big Crow and day trip from there.  But I wouldn't do it in June - the bugs might eat them alive and make for an awful experience instead of a great one.  Third week of May the trout will be active and the bugs will be relatively light compared to June (a guide, not a rule).  

Plenty of day trip options - climb the fire tower hill, do the white pine hike, explore the Crow River downstream of Big Crow - and that's where you'll get your fish action as well.

From the water taxi dropoff at Proulx it's an easy 4 hours to Big Crow after an easy portage.  Kid friendly, I would say.

Trip Reports » Back from 6 Days on Sec (Pics and Videos) » 11/08/2017 7:04 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 13

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Great looking shots - you clearly have a special skill at coaxing most of the beauty of a scene to pass through the lens.  The star trails with the moonlight and camp lights are tremendous.

How funny that ATV spotted the sawdust from his trip in a shot...that's a brush with fame there!

Equipment and Technique » How do ya portage that? » 10/25/2017 3:10 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 10

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I'm just glad the word yolk didn't make it into this thread.  Hate that.

Where Is This? » Where in Algonquin? No.192 » 10/19/2017 5:51 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 16

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Wait, I've been somewhere where Peek hasn't been????  What are the odds of that?????

Where Is This? » Where in Algonquin? No.192 » 10/18/2017 2:25 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 16

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Is that Deer Yard from the Hemlock portage?  Don't recall as many water plants, but was there in May before they have grown up to be visible.

Board footera