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Where Is This? » Where in Algonquin? No.187 » 9/15/2017 2:53 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 24

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There aren't many lakes that I've visited that I'm not fond of...but I have limited photos on my work laptop so they tend to be somewhat redundant.  Of benefit to someone like you who pays attention!

Where Is This? » Where in Algonquin #186 » 9/14/2017 8:23 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 6

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Vanslyke was close with that guess, but, as usual, Peek nailed it!

It is a view from campsite #1 on the PCI index (the one on the peninsula south of the "devil's razor") looking to the east across the bay.  Further to the right but off-screen of the image is one of the most coveted sites on the lake.

You've got to get up pretty early to fool Peek, apparently!

Where Is This? » Where in Algonquin #186 » 9/13/2017 2:00 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 6

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Sorry, Abe, not Sunbeam.

And sorry, not sorry, Martin!!!  ;-)  I have a feeling you'll fill that empty hole in your heart with a new kevlar love interest!

Where Is This? » Where in Algonquin #186 » 9/13/2017 12:09 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 6

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A special shout out to MartinG - just sold me his old 16' Swift Prospector on Labor Day weekend and it paddles like a dream!  Thanks so much Martin!!!

Now, on to the show...

I expect some will find this a piece of cake
Like paddling with a little wake
To see these young ladies enjoy the park
Brings great joy to my heart!http://i68.tinypic.com/122jak7.jpg

Trip Reports » Big Trout Revisited After 40+ Years » 9/13/2017 12:02 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 3

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Impressive route, gentlemen!  That's a lot of distance both on the water and on land...and then doing portages three and four-thirds times doesn't help the old bones feel young!

Great to see it, Raccoon! 

Where Is This? » Where in Algonquin 185 » 9/13/2017 6:18 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 7

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It's not the stream between Dickson and Hardy Bay, viewed from the Hardy Bay/Lavieille side?

Catch-all Discussions » Backcountry Pet Peeves » 9/12/2017 2:37 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 31

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Looking at that photo is yet another reminder of just how anal-retentive I am!

Catch-all Discussions » Backcountry Pet Peeves » 9/12/2017 1:06 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 31

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Claire,

Meal packaging-wise, here's what I do and you may find a similar system might work for you.  I have one generic "kitchen bag" with cookset, plates, hard rolls, crackers, spices, soap, cloth, utensils, peanut butter, honey, etc - it's a grab bag of all the stuff that is used frequently for most meals and if we're day-tripping we grab that along with one or two of the bags below.  This limits the search for odd kitchen items to a single bag instead of fishing around in a giant backpack or drybag.  In the past I've actually used a cloth farmers market bag for the kitchen bag - it's got long handles that can sling over the shoulder for a short portage and it holds a ton of stuff without ripping.

ll food is in drybags that I get from walmart cheap here:  
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Outdoor-Recreation-Group-Set-of-3-Ultimate-Dry-Sacks/10928125

1. Breakfast bag - a little blue drybag that has stuff that is just used for breakfast - oatmeal, granola, dry milk, tea, coffee, cinnamon/br. Sugar, cranberries, nuts
2. Day 1 Lunch - whatever it is, it's in there.  
3. Day 1 Dinner - Chicken & Dumplings mix, apple pie
4. Day 2 lunch/dinner - Tortilla soup, hummus, cashews, chicken cacciatore, s'mores
5. Day 3 lunch/dinner - black bean soup, olive tapenade, peanut butter, stuffed peppers, apples, jerky
6. Day 4 lunch/dinner - salsa, chips, jerky, gorp, spaghetti, sauce, fresh parmesan
7. Day 5 lunch/dinner - cheese, gorp, chocolate, tortillas, refried beans, salsa, ground beef

I've found it really easy because I have all the special ingredients and food for each day's meals in one bag for that day and I only have to dig through the small kitchen bag for the odd item.  It has really made the meal assembly, prep and consumption a fairly organized affair instead of the mayhem I used to go through.

Here's a photo of the preparation right before packing each dry bag.  In this case, the columns of food represent what would be consumed each day and the stuff across the

Catch-all Discussions » Backcountry Pet Peeves » 9/12/2017 9:50 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 31

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Camping is not easy...and that's what makes the reward of a successful trip that much better.  I take it upon myself to try to make everyone's experience a good one by shouldering as much of the workload as possible.

I have similar pet peeves as you with organization, timing, activities, etc. and really have to work hard to make sure I'm communicating not just the "what" but also the "why" when it is appropriate.  Among the many planning discussions heading into the trip include the menu and necessities to bring, when we get to the camp we then discuss things like organization, meal times, etc.  This lets them know that "we'll use this area for cooking supplies - that way we don't contaminate our clothes with the smells of food and attract bears into our tent at night - and that area for clothing and this area for extra stuff" so that everyone is aware of the distribution of stuff and why it is done.

Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't.  It is often difficult for folks who are new to camping to come up with a "system" for where and how to store their stuff without a closet, cabinet or dresser and takes time to get settled in.  It sounds like you had both ends of the spectrum with you and your in-laws - newer folks who take time to acclimate to the process and experienced folks who are a bit on the particular side.  But isn't that like so many interactions - understanding our perspective and others' perspectives and arriving at a common understanding?

Fishing » Fall Lake Trout » 9/06/2017 12:51 pm

PaPaddler
Replies: 7

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You could also try jigging while drifting with the wind with jigs or spoons with a piece of worm on the tip. Really anything that will get you deep - probably between 10 and 30 feet depending upon water temperatures.  It's easy to do that with a jig (deer hair, twister) as the wind gradually pushes you.  Wind speed will determine how much line you need to let out to be deep enough.  It's surprising how a little wind can move a canoe - adjust your speed with a few paddle strokes here or there to speed up or slow down.

We've found the best luck around steep drop-offs near shallower water (i.e. a point of land or island jutting out into deeper water).  The trout can hang deep but move up to shallower water briefly to feed around the shoal.

Equipment » Any Hangers? » 9/06/2017 5:14 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 17

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Started with a Hennessey scout and Expedition A-Sym with bottom entrance and then got two more A-Sym with the side zipper (family of four, we all have a hammock).  I wouldn't say we use them exclusively, but probably 70% of the time we camp it is in the hammocks.  

I've camped in snow and used the standard rectangular sleeping pad - cool elbows but warm otherwise.

Kids are grown (one in college, one graduated) and they have borrowed them to use for various group activities and really enjoy them.  It's nice when you teach them how to do something and they embrace it and move forward with it.

Trip Planning » Madawaska lake » 9/05/2017 10:33 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 5

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While I don't know, I expect it might be associated with the single, small lot of private land on the eastern edge of the lake - grandfathered in the use of a small motor attached to a canoe for the single owner of that property.  Perhaps they portage one in and leave it on their land for use when they visit?

Not many other likely scenarios - most lakes that allow motors usually are immediately accessible or at least have cart path access.

Equipment » October clothing. » 8/31/2017 6:48 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 25

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@ the pimp...I've never had anything from L.L. Bean that was substandard.  The nice thing is, their return policy is top notch.

@ Ed, Edd & EddyTurn...not a misprint.  No doubt that cotton gets wet like a wick...it also dries out fast in front of a fire.  I still use a substantial amount of cotton clothing even in May.  I've got other layers that are designed to keep me dry but I haven't found a pair of pants that offer the warmth, durability and comfort of cotton against my skin.  I always have some wool or fleece for my torso when it's cold that retains its warming capabilities when wet but prefer cotton fibers for my pants.

Equipment » October clothing. » 8/30/2017 11:52 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 25

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As others have said, layering is key and a toque is nearly indispensable.  What I usually go with...

warm socks (smartwool are nice)
base layer
jeans or other quick-dry fabric
t-shirt
flannel or chamois shirt
fleece or wool sweater - I'd try L.L. Bean - they have good stuff
jacket 
rain suit
gloves

I use the rain suit for rain or for that outer layer when cold and windy to help keep the heat in.  When traveling it's not necessary or practical to wear all layers but when hanging around the site the warmth is needed.  Be able to start a fire in the rain.  We've had some roaring fires in May to help drive the chill away after cold, long days.
 

Where Is This? » Where in AP #178 » 8/20/2017 8:58 am

PaPaddler
Replies: 17

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Cauchon to Little Cauchon?

Board footera