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Equipment » Portable Solar Chargers » Yesterday 6:37 pm

RobW
Replies: 17

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That's good feedback on the Anker's. Thanks

Equipment » Portable Solar Chargers » 1/19/2018 9:31 am

RobW
Replies: 17

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I have heard that Anker has a good reputation and had them bookmarked too: https://www.amazon.ca/Anker-PowerCore-Portable-Double-Speed-Recharging/dp/B01JIWQPMW/ref=dp_ob_title_wld

Catch is that the Anker battery packs seem to run about 2X some of the competitors for the same capacity. I'm not sure if they're worth the extra cost or not. 

Equipment » Portable Solar Chargers » 1/18/2018 10:01 am

RobW
Replies: 17

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How long are your trips? 

I'm considering battery packs like this one: https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B012S6IHQC/_encoding=UTF8?coliid=I13JVVT07F24MB&colid=2GKIAEYA6DKCC&psc=0 

I figure on trips under 2 weeks the battery pack is going to be more flexible and reliable. 
 

Where Is This? » Where #214 » 1/15/2018 1:58 pm

RobW
Replies: 10

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I remember a really muddy stretch at the north end of Club Lake that could fit. The portage sign would be Waterclear and you would be looking back towards Club after the portage took you around most of the mud. 

Catch-all Discussions » Ontario Parks Summer Jobs » 1/03/2018 10:32 am

RobW
Replies: 1

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The job postings for Ontario Parks summer jobs, including the Student - Park Ranger jobs in Algonquin are up today:

https://www.gojobs.gov.on.ca/Preview.aspx?Language=English&JobID=116776

If you have a kid who loves canoeing, then this is an awesome way to spend your whole summer in the park and get paid for it. 

Backcountry » Winter camp clothes » 12/18/2017 4:25 pm

RobW
Replies: 26

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Buying gear just might be an even bigger part of the overall ritual than route planning! :-)
 

Where Is This? » Where in Algonquin #208 » 12/15/2017 2:57 pm

RobW
Replies: 21

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From the clue I know it has something to do with the Fossmill Outlet but I can't quite pinpoint where within that area it would be, particularly when it's a daytrip out of Achray which rules out the portions of the Petawawa that I would like to guess. 

Where Is This? » Where in Algonquin? No.206 » 12/12/2017 1:51 pm

RobW
Replies: 17

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The 50km radius around Little Tarn Lake is a bit helpful as it would appear to rule out anything west Opeongo or Radiant. North of 60 doesn't help as much given the radius, but rules out a small bit of the panhandle. 

For lack of a better guess, I'm going to say it's from the 1st campsite on river left after passing the ranger cabin below Crooked Chute on the Petawawa. 

Catch-all Discussions » Squatch'in » 12/07/2017 9:23 am

RobW
Replies: 20

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I don't see this recent news posted on this thread yet. The Sasquatch's Asian cousin the Yeti has been proving to be a bear:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/yeti-dna-tested-1.4417918 

In terms of the DNA tests that ScouterGriz mentions, it is quite easy for DNA in hair samples to become "degraded". In fact unless you get the root of the hair it likely won't contain useful DNA to start with:

https://www.forensicmag.com/article/2013/04/challenges-dna-testing-and-forensic-analysis-hair-samples

Given the nature of collecting field samples, particularly using unattended methods such as barbed wire hair traps you can also expect a fairly high percentage of contaminated samples even before the human researcher comes along to collect them. For example a bird collecting some of the hair to line a nest would be likely to contaminate the rest of the hair sample by contact. Air born seeds or spores could also get caught in the hair without any animal intervention. 

I would interpret the "inconclusive" category as just that - it doesn't match a known species with enough statistical confidence (typically 99% for this kind of research) - and neither is it either complete enough a sample or distinctly different enough to be 99% confident that it is not a known species.

In other words the "inconclusive" group leaves the door open for something new to be discovered but doesn't have enough evidence to make scientifically justified claims of identifying a new species. 
 

Backcountry » Winter camp clothes » 12/05/2017 9:25 am

RobW
Replies: 26

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Historically the reason I was taught for changing before bed was because "your clothes are wet and you need to change into dry clothes". The explanation was that your clothes soak up enough moisture from the inside out during the day that you are better off changing and will be warmer during the night if you do change. 

You would then put your clothes for the next day in the sleeping bag with you overnight to warm them up. 

Of course that was long before the days of poly pro everything and the magical wicking qualities of today;'s tech clothing. Quite a while ago I had asked on some forum (might have been here) if the 'rule' of changing before bed still made sense if you are wearing however many layers of poly pro and the moisture is getting wicked away. 
 

Where Is This? » Where in APP #205 » 12/04/2017 9:22 am

RobW
Replies: 3

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Nice looking spot

Backcountry » Winter camp clothes » 11/24/2017 9:36 pm

RobW
Replies: 26

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APPaul wrote:

...
When I say dry, it doesn't mean gortex 24/7 as it can trap moisture. It is what ever combination of layers vents sweat when needed and blocks external moisture when needed.

Exactly. On a cold winter day it's not uncommon to end up with a layer of frost under my outer shell from the moisture that has evaporated through the inner layers and then condensed and frozen as it got close to the outside. Gortex or other breathable fabrics are still useful for protecting from outside moisture on a wet winter day but the cold air temp will keep them from venting moisture from the inside. 

Backcountry » Winter camp clothes » 11/22/2017 3:12 pm

RobW
Replies: 26

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Layering is always the recommended approach. If you have base layers, mid layers, fleece and an outer shell with room for an extra fleece underneath then you're in pretty good shape. 

As you said, moving around you're generally warm and that's where layering is key to being able to adjust your insulation and try to stay warm but not enough to sweat. Where you want bigger layers is when you're sitting still for an extended period. That could be around camp while cooking, etc. and if you were cold tenting then at night too. However at night you're relying on your sleeping bag (and liner) for extra warmth in addition to whatever layers you're wearing to sleep in. 

I generally spend more time around the cottage in the winter rather than camping so I'm not as careful with managing layers as I would be camping without a guaranteed place to warm up. Often the down liner in my winter coat will be soaked from sweat by the end of the day. That's a clear indication that I should have been stripping off a couple of layers during the day. 

Winter is a good time for down filled coats and if you're out in -25C or lower then you'll be really glad you invested in it. On the other hand if you're being flexible in picking your dates to get some warmer temps for a first time winter camping trip then you may already have the layered clothing to handle it. 
 

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